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Thread: Butch Harner cleaver

  1. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by quantumcloud509 View Post
    Sorry for the short question. Let me expand. Is this cleaver better in action than the Takeda, or does it outperform, or are they two totally different animals and Ill have to purchase both of them to find that out? Is this a good chopping cleaver that can handle a beating? I understand supporting the small guy over the smaller guy, but I also really like the Takeda for its J handle, and have been trying to step away from western handles.
    Whoa! Neither one is a "chopping" cleaver! You want one of those, go get a Dexter Russell.

  2. #22
    my take on a slicing cleaver is a double tall nakiri and full flat ground from edge to spine with only slight convex at the edge also a diffference is that wht center of the blade is mostly flat with only a slight "smile" that turns up at both the heel and the "tip"


    so far as handles well i could likly do any think any one wanted to have done shape wise

    that said i sure will not be the cheapest c leaver to buy (i have not made one in liek 2 years as they are a PITA )

  3. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by quantumcloud509 View Post
    Sorry for the short question. Let me expand. Is this cleaver better in action than the Takeda, or does it outperform, or are they two totally different animals and Ill have to purchase both of them to find that out? Is this a good chopping cleaver that can handle a beating? I understand supporting the small guy over the smaller guy, but I also really like the Takeda for its J handle, and have been trying to step away from western handles.
    These are both slicing cleavers, essentially the Asian equivalent of a chef knife. They would never be used for chopping bones or hard objects. These are very sharp and sometimes delicate instruments. some here love them more then chef knives and some feel that they are much more versatile. It takes some practice to be exceptional in it's use, but when you become proficient everything else becomes easier. You would be amazed at what some chefs can do with them. If you chop bones and other hard objects with this you face the possibility of not only chipping the edge, but possibly breaking the blade or worse yet hurting yourself.
    I haven't lived the life I wanted, just the lives I needed too at the time.

  4. #24
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    Son is absolutely right as usual. A good cleaver can do almost everything EXCEPT chop through bones like a monster cleaver, if you want to split the bones to get at the marrow or do primal cuts get a heavy blunt meat cleaver.

    On the other hand, I use a 'chopping' motion with a slight draw cut for most cutting tasks with a cleaver. If you want to do fine slicing, put your index finger on top of the spine and do a forward and back slice, a sharp one will give you a fine cut for sushi if it will not lay them out in a nice line. I use my heavier Saji to disjoint chickens with a six cut progession including splitting the spine from the tail to the neck, and will cut through the cooked thigh bones for Hacked Chicken-but this is the heavier version. I would not try to cut anything denser than that, not with a 15-16 degree grind.

    Cleavers properly used are faster and safer than french style knives as your fingers are further from the blade. Cleavers are the closest thing to an all-purpose knife that there is, in the Chinese kitchen I managed in Bermuda the Chefs had two chukabochos, one light and one heavier, and a long thin paring knife. They laughed at 'Western Chef' who carried around a bag filled with twenty knives, particularly when I used a cleaver as a line knife. When Thong Chai wanted to break down a whole hog he used a six pound single bevel cleaver with an upswept point, a chukabocho is great but NOT FOR BONES.


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  5. #25
    Senior Member quantumcloud509's Avatar
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    Ha! Felt the energy of your guys' responce there. Thank you for all of the input. I wish I could say I knew all that stuff but I didnt and now I do- muahaha. Good luck with the sale of this beautiful knife man. I figured spending $650 on knives this week is enough for me...still trying to pay off the engagement ring before proposing...

  6. #26
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    Congrats on the forthcoming proposal!
    Don't feel stupid, it is kind of counter intuitive as a "Westerner" that a cleaver is not for cleaving. Another reason it's confusing is that you will often see Chinese cleavers being used to go through bones, cartilage, etc, because the knife beng used is a $10 version off the shelf of an Asian grocery store. Needless to say, a cleaver like a Takeda, or Harner is too great/expensive of a knife to be misused in such a way...you should see the edges of a $10 cleaver after being used for everything. It looks like the Rockies!
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  7. #27
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    Quote Originally Posted by quantumcloud509 View Post
    Ha! Felt the energy of your guys' responce there. Thank you for all of the input. I wish I could say I knew all that stuff but I didnt and now I do- muahaha. Good luck with the sale of this beautiful knife man. I figured spending $650 on knives this week is enough for me...still trying to pay off the engagement ring before proposing...
    Good luck on the proposal. We weren't trying to beat you down, we were educating. ha!ha!
    I haven't lived the life I wanted, just the lives I needed too at the time.

  8. #28
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    Quote Originally Posted by quantumcloud509 View Post
    Ha! Felt the energy of your guys' responce there. Thank you for all of the input. I wish I could say I knew all that stuff but I didnt and now I do- muahaha. Good luck with the sale of this beautiful knife man. I figured spending $650 on knives this week is enough for me...still trying to pay off the engagement ring before proposing...
    Congratulations on the upcoming proposal (and all that goes with it).

    If there was overreaction, it's because of this particular video on YouTube:



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  9. #29
    Senior Member Johnny.B.Good's Avatar
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    I love how she carefully lines up where she wants to make her cut on the carrot before just swinging wildly at it and letting the piece fly off the cutting board (probably onto the floor). "Expert" village indeed.

  10. #30
    Senior Member Crothcipt's Avatar
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    I can't believe I watched that again. 3rd whack that blade was toast already.

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