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Thread: Project knife ID and advice

  1. #1
    Senior Member dreamsignals's Avatar
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    Project knife ID and advice

    Hi all,

    A friend of mine's dad gave her a set of japanese kitchen a few years ago and told her to take care of them..to which she responded by keeping them in the a drawer and not using them at all. A couple of months ago I got her and her husband started with a 3-piece Tojiro DP set, and finding out about my budding knife-geekness they trusted me with bringing the set back to life.

    In all, it seems like none of the knives has ever been significantly used or sharpened.

    If you look at the pictures, they're not in all bad shape. The petty (second smallest, with the broken tip) had a nice rusty crust that I worked out with BKF and cork, which revealed some pitting, but nothing terrible. I quickly sharpened it (I was already late to work) just to see what it could do, and it got pretty sharp pretty fast. I got the knives yesterday and haven't done anything else yet.

    So here are my questions:

    Can anybody help identify the knives? The smallest one has "Masatoshi" written in roman alphabet. The other have Kanji (?). Googling I found this.

    I've never had to fix a broken tip this big, but I'm guessing I should just grind from the spine, so to maintain the original profile. I"m tempted to just flatten it, giving it a 'kiritsuke look' instead of going through the trouble of rounding it (also, I don't have any power tools for this, so all with be done with stones). What do you say?

    The handles are what seem to be in worse shape. Lots of small gaps all around, with some visible rusting, and the wood is less than smooth at this point. I have no woodwork skills whatsoever and could not dream of rehandling them. How should I go about this?

    Thanks










    -thiago

  2. #2
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    sachem allison's Avatar
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    they actually don't look to bad. your standard fit and finish issues. I would sand the handles down to the metal and then soak them in some mineral oil, they look a little dry. the handles should swell up once they absorb the oil. Then sand smooth. The blades don't look too bad either. get some cork and wrap some sandpaper around it and some dishsoap on the blade, work it in one direction and take it up to a 600 or 800 grit. I wouldn't go much more then that, as things will tend to stick. For my own preference a nice satin finish is best. Make sure you smooth out that bolster it looks a little rough and while your at it hit the spine and choil. For the broken tip, you can go either way. The direction of the break gets you half way to Kiritsuke tip and a rounded tip. start from the spine side. If you don't want to wear out your stones and don't have power tools, go outside and use the sidewalk or a cinder block to get the bulk of the metal off, That's what I do when it happens to me. Finish with the stones, sharpen and enjoy.

  3. #3
    Senior Member Johnny.B.Good's Avatar
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    I am interested in seeing the "after" shots of these.

    Good luck.

  4. #4
    Rounding the tip on a stone is much easier than the kiritsuke thing.

  5. #5
    Senior Member dreamsignals's Avatar
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    Thanks for the advice!

    Quote Originally Posted by sachem allison View Post
    I would sand the handles down to the metal and then soak them in some mineral oil, they look a little dry. the handles should swell up once they absorb the oil. Then sand smooth.
    Should I not sand only after the oil soak?


    Quote Originally Posted by sachem allison View Post
    Make sure you smooth out that bolster it looks a little rough
    What do you mean exactly? Smooth the "sharp" corners where it slopes up?
    -thiago

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    Senior Member dreamsignals's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by BurkeCutlery View Post
    Rounding the tip on a stone is much easier than the kiritsuke thing.
    Why do think that?
    -thiago

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    Smooth out the handles and oil them, take care of any rust spots with BKF but I wouldn't try to refuse the blades, let them wear their age with pride. Start slicing some rare beef and watch the colours

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    sachem allison's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by dreamsignals View Post
    Thanks for the advice!



    Should I not sand only after the oil soak?
    You will get a much smoother and tighter fit if you sand first, it will open the pores, so they can absorb the oil better. Once they pump up do a little touch up sanding and you should have a nice tight handle.




    What do you mean exactly? Smooth the "sharp" corners where it slopes up?
    You will get a much smoother and tighter fit if you sand first, it will open the pores, so they can absorb the oil better. Once they pump up do a little touch up sanding and you should have a nice tight handle.
    exactly that.

  9. #9
    Senior Member dreamsignals's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by sachem allison View Post
    You will get a much smoother and tighter fit if you sand first, it will open the pores, so they can absorb the oil better. Once they pump up do a little touch up sanding and you should have a nice tight handle.
    exactly that.
    and what grip sandpaper should i begin with? should i care about a progression, or just start with a finer grit?
    -thiago

  10. #10
    Senior Member Benuser's Avatar
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    The grit for opening the pores isn't that important. Someting around P400 if you're using fresh paper. Just a few strokes will do.

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