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Thread: Using the rough side of leather strops

  1. #1
    Senior Member Benuser's Avatar
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    Using the rough side of leather strops

    I would like to know if people use the rough - split - side rather than the smooth - grain - side when stropping. I experienced the rough one, charged with Cr2O3, to be a great deburrer. In case of emergency sharpening on just a Chosera 800 followed by stropping on the rough leather gave an excellent and durable result. Any thoughts?

  2. #2

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    I use both

  3. #3
    Senior Member Salty dog's Avatar
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    Same

  4. #4
    Senior Member NO ChoP!'s Avatar
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    Yup, the split side leaves a nice toothy edge...
    The difference between try and triumph is a little "umph"! NO EXCUSES!!!!!!!
    chefchristophermiller@yahoo.com

  5. #5
    Senior Member zitangy's Avatar
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    1. Have been doing it raw ( raw hide.. rough side ) for quite some time, IF there happened to be a large burr.. it will save your smooth leather.

    2. Apart from being more grabby, it will also hold whatever paste compound block you add including diamond spray

    3. Been testing Horse hide vs cow hide. I am beginning to prefer the cowhide (10-12 oz, slightly thicker ) that’s the measurement that was noted on the samples that I received from my custom leather maker in NY.

    4. I chance to get a section that has a softer portion, presumably form the stomach area and I like it as the knife sinks in slightly.

    5. For the time being , I prefer just stropping on the raw hide.

    6. Deburring: for burrs formed on 1000 grit stones and below , I prefer to deburr it on a diamond rod of about 1000 grit. The logic is that rougher stones tends to leave larger burrs. Also knives that has a stubborn burrs.. I will use the rod of suitable grit.

    7. I think a lot of sharpening problems are due burr removals ; not removing or or straightening it out thus leaving a wire edge or a weak edge. That why I believe that finishing strokes for burr removal should be cutting into the stone strokes…. To cut away the burr as opposed to just flattening it out …..Just my view..

    8. Having said the above, I am able to cut into the leather stroke on one side of the knife and the course side is more tolerant…

    Have fun...

  6. #6
    Senior Member Cadillac J's Avatar
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    If using a leather strop to finish, I've personally have always used the smooth side. I've messed around with the rougher side and haven't found the results to be too much different really. And although the rougher would be better to strop on for burr removal, I still think the felt pad does a better job.

  7. #7
    Senior Member stevenStefano's Avatar
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    I always use the rough side and I only use it. It takes the stropping medium a lot better I find and it leaves a really nice edge. I use a rather flimsy strop and I find the smooth side sorta warps a bit more than the rough

  8. #8
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    I use both. Rough for the green chrome and smooth for the finer white compound.

  9. #9
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    I like 'em all. Best ever was Dave's original super thin sueded leather strop. Love that stuff. I'm babying the three i have left. I only use the smooth ones for razors though. They are too slow otherwise since they don't hold the compound well.

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