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  1. #1

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    Prolonging greens

    Got a question about salad greens.

    I work as a line cook at a psuedo-country club, the ritzy (serious) county golf club. I work with a bunch of idiots, my Chef won't deny that. My co-workers have a bad habit of making up three weeks worth of food or more and I watch it rot by the end of the week.

    One thing I'm constantly throwing out is salad. Typical scenario is they have a buffet on Friday or Saturday night with salad on it. After it's over they take all the left over lettuce and put it in a plastic carboy and toss it in the reach in, covered of course. By Monday or Tuesday it is rust colored, sometimes with brown liquid pooling at the bottom.

    Is there a better way?

    I know lettuce is cheap but if I ever want to go to the next level I have to learn about cost control and not wasting lettuce does seem to me less than trivial.

    Thanks!

    -AJ

  2. #2
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    Nitrogen gas.
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  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by ajhuff View Post
    Got a question about salad greens.

    I work as a line cook at a psuedo-country club, the ritzy (serious) county golf club. I work with a bunch of idiots, my Chef won't deny that. My co-workers have a bad habit of making up three weeks worth of food or more and I watch it rot by the end of the week.

    One thing I'm constantly throwing out is salad. Typical scenario is they have a buffet on Friday or Saturday night with salad on it. After it's over they take all the left over lettuce and put it in a plastic carboy and toss it in the reach in, covered of course. By Monday or Tuesday it is rust colored, sometimes with brown liquid pooling at the bottom.

    Is there a better way?

    I know lettuce is cheap but if I ever want to go to the next level I have to learn about cost control and not wasting lettuce does seem to me less than trivial.

    Thanks!

    -AJ
    only one answer don't cut so much, that's really the only way to keep that food cost down. get a tighter control on your prep, that;s it. there are books and programs out there that can give you a reasonable way to estimate what portion the average person will eat and you make your prep based on that with a little left over for safety sake. If you know that every weekend you have a case of prepped lettuce left over than the next week cut a case less. you can always cut more if you need it.
    Sounds, like the problem is your chef, He isn't doing his job. He is too, lazy to take control of the kitchen and is okay with the status quo. Where is your Sous chef, he should have a handle on this. If you are a line cook and are worrying about these things it sounds like it's time for you to step up and lead by example. learn what it takes to be a sous chef and show your chef your willingness to do the things he isn't. Lots of Country club chefs are there because they are burnt out and it's an easy gig. They don't want to deal with the day in and day out issues of the kitchen, that's what Sous chefs and Banquet chefs are for.
    have fun and prep less
    son
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  4. #4
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    remember it's all the cheap stuff that adds up over time and can break your food cost. It is almost never the high dollar stuff, because we watch that stuff like hawks and usually know where it went.
    I haven't lived the life I wanted, just the lives I needed too at the time.

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by sachem allison View Post
    remember it's all the cheap stuff that adds up over time and can break your food cost. It is almost never the high dollar stuff, because we watch that stuff like hawks and usually know where it went.
    +1.

    How true that is!!!

  6. #6
    Senior Member Salty dog's Avatar
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    I always tell my guys that in a prefect world you're cutting the last couple salads to order.

  7. #7

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    Quote Originally Posted by sachem allison View Post
    Sounds, like the problem is your chef, He isn't doing his job. He is too, lazy to take control of the kitchen and is okay with the status quo. son
    That's a home run!
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  8. #8

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    Quote Originally Posted by sachem allison View Post
    only one answer don't cut so much, that's really the only way to keep that food cost down. get a tighter control on your prep, that;s it.
    son
    Yeah, I knew this this. It's what I keep hammering on. I was just wondering if there might be some better storage methods.

    We're kind a unique situation where we are fully staffed by interns. And unfortunately in our demographics that does not mean that we have the best of the best working. I'm finding that for ever 20 culinary students, at most 3 really get it, at most. And of the remaining 17 or so, at least 10 shouldn't be there at all. And I don't know why they are.

    I'll keep trying to improve things within the limited constraints that I have.

    Thanks!

    -AJ

  9. #9
    that is seriously lazy food management. But I do have to say that Friday to Monday shouldn't render salad greens totally ****** off, unless your knives are completely useless. If I prep greens for the salad bar on Monday, they get used, but if they get lost and I find them on thursday, they aren't rust colored and wilted. Just too old for me to want to use.

    My greens start smelling like milk before they get wilted and brown.

  10. #10
    Senior Member Mint427's Avatar
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    I pitched the question to a client who owns a smaller restaurant. Depends on the greens. He wraps iceberg in paper towels and places them in open, plastic container in the cooler, careful to remove as much water from washing. If he's using mixed greens, they are more fragile and tend to wilt faster so he purchases less of it. Hope that helps.

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