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  1. #1

    PierreRodrigue's Avatar
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    Perfect fries?

    I'm wondering if anyone might have a technique to making home made fries. Fully cooked through, crispy outside, not greasy or soggy. I would say recipe, but unless the potatoes are coated, it has to be technique, right?


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    Senior Member Lucretia's Avatar
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    Do you fry yours twice? I haven't done it, but my understanding is the trick is to fry them once at a lower temperature to cook the potato through, then again at a higher temp to crisp and brown them.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Lucretia View Post
    Do you fry yours twice? I haven't done it, but my understanding is the trick is to fry them once at a lower temperature to cook the potato through, then again at a higher temp to crisp and brown them.
    +1

    Pour oil in a deep fryer or heavy saucepan to reach halfway up the sides of the pan. Heat to 325 degrees F. Peel and cut the potatoes, putting the cut potatoes in a bowl of ice water to release some of the starch and to keep them from turning brown.

    Dry the potatoes thoroughly, to keep the oil from splattering. Fry the potatoes in batches so the pan isn't crowded and the oil temperature does not plummet. Cook for 3 minutes until they are soft but not browned. Remove the potatoes and drain on brown paper bags.

    Bring oil temperature up to 375 degrees F. Return the partly fried potatoes to the oil in batches and cook a second time for 4 minutes until golden and crispy. Drain on fresh brown paper bags. Salt and serve immediately.

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    Chef Niloc's Avatar
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    Biggest trick is to cook them 2x

    I'll assume our using a home deep fryer or pot with a thermometer.

    Picking the right potato is also helps, I think the russets potato works best IMHO

    Sold state cooking oil, IE oils that are sold at room temp. Use crisco or lard.

    Don't let them soak in water, but you can rinse them if you want

    Ok so oil at 350 add only enough fries as to not cool the oil off more the 25* when the oil hits 350 again or about 1/2 a minute take the potato out and let he rest on something that will let them drain ( wire rack or basket is best but paper towels work),your only blanching them at this point. Now once there all blanched fry them again in batches.

  5. #5
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    Whilst I have not done this myself, I have seen this procedure outlined by reputable sources!
    Spike C
    "The Buddha resides as comfortably in the circuits of a digital computer or the gears of a cycle transmission as he does at the top of a mountain."
    Pirsig

  6. #6
    Senior Member Candlejack's Avatar
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    First blanch quickly, this will get the starch to the outside of the fry.
    Then cool down in the freezer so it dries, fry once at lower temp.

    Let it pour off, then chill down

    And then higher temp until crispy.



    You can watch Heston Blumenthals "The perfect fry" if you want an even more complicated and more perfect fry.

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by Pensacola Tiger View Post
    +1

    Pour oil in a deep fryer or heavy saucepan to reach halfway up the sides of the pan. Heat to 325 degrees F. Peel and cut the potatoes, putting the cut potatoes in a bowl of ice water to release some of the starch and to keep them from turning brown.

    Dry the potatoes thoroughly, to keep the oil from splattering. Fry the potatoes in batches so the pan isn't crowded and the oil temperature does not plummet. Cook for 3 minutes until they are soft but not browned. Remove the potatoes and drain on brown paper bags.

    Bring oil temperature up to 375 degrees F. Return the partly fried potatoes to the oil in batches and cook a second time for 4 minutes until golden and crispy. Drain on fresh brown paper bags. Salt and serve immediately.
    Beat me to it.
    I don't like to let them sit in water as it washes some of the starch out, but if your cuting enough that they will turn color ice water is a good wy to go.

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by Chef Niloc View Post
    Beat me to it.
    I don't like to let them sit in water as it washes some of the starch out, but if your cuting enough that they will turn color ice water is a good wy to go.
    I agree about russets being the best. The center of the fries are fluffier.

  9. #9
    Senior Member Johnny.B.Good's Avatar
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    I make fake "fries" all the time as a side dish with a sirloin steak or hamburger using the following recipe from my father.

    You might think that writing this first bit down, something so simple and obvious, isn’t worth the effort. But it’s as easy to do it wrong as right and they are not only very good but foolproof once you get it.

    Ingredients

    - as many russet potatoes as you need
    - olive oil
    - butter
    - salt and pepper to taste

    Preparation

    1. Preheat the oven to 425 degrees.
    2. Using as many potatoes as you need (maybe 1 ½ mid-sized russets per person as a normal side dish), peel them and slice into “jumbo” fries, about ½ inch square and the length of the potatoes. Note: The large size makes them easier to handle in the cooking process (smaller and they tend to break up) and allows you to crisp the outside while leaving the inside soft. When cutting them out of the potato, just throw away any trimmings that are too small to cook properly.
    3. Thoroughly rinse the fries in a colander. Now rinse them again. Now rinse them again and pour the damp potatoes onto a clean cotton towel to dry a bit. If they are not properly rinsed, they will stick to each other and to the cooking pan with a mess the result.
    4. These fries must be cooked in a single layer in a pan or they will steam, not become crisp. In one or more Pyrex or other pans sufficient to hold the potatoes in one layer, enough oil (Canola is tasteless and fine) to just cover the bottom plus a couple of tablespoons of butter. Place the pan in the oven just long enough to melt the butter.
    5. Now place the fries in the pan and gently stir them around to coat with the oil/butter mixture without breaking them up. Arrange in a single layer and sprinkle with salt and pepper.
    6. Roast for a total of about 45 minutes to an hour or until properly browned all to your liking. Shake the pan after the first few minutes of cooking to make sure they don’t stick to the bottom/sides or each other. About 2/3 of the way through the projected cooking time, remove from the oven and gently turn over each fry with tongs to crisp on the other side and avoid breaking them. Replace in the oven and cook until done. Serve immediately.

    Comment

    If you get screwed up on timing the meal, you can delay the potatoes by stopping after you turn them over then not putting them back in the oven until you have about fifteen minutes to go with the other elements (and fifteen minutes on the potatoes too). I’ve done it many times and it’s not a problem. They do have to be served immediately after coming out of the oven to be best.

  10. #10
    Senior Member Deckhand's Avatar
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    Good advice. The only other thing I do at home is I have some metal grates I put over a tray with paper towels. When I am done frying them in my pan I toss them on the grate to let the oil drip off. I use a Joseph and Joseph scoop colander to get them out of the oil, but a Spider strainer etc would do the same thing.

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