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Thread: Perfect fries?

  1. #11
    The alleles created by mutation may be beneficial


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    From Modernist Cuisine: "The Perfect Fry"
    Cut potatoes into batons and rinse them to get rid of surface starch. Vacuum-seals them in a plastic bag, in one even layer, with water. Heat the bag to 212 degrees for 15 minutes, steaming the batons. Then hit the bag with ultrasound to cavitate the water—45 minutes on each side. Reheat the bag in an oven to 212 degrees for five minutes, and put the hot fries on a rack in a vacuum chamber, and then blanche them in 338-degree oil for three minutes. When they’re cool, deep fry the potatoes in oil at 375 degrees until they’re crisp, about three more minutes, and then drain them on paper towels. Total preparation time: two hours.

    Or you could just blanch in 325 oil and finish in 375. Your choice

  2. #12

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    pressure fryer makes the best fries, but I have never tried a home model

  3. #13
    Quote Originally Posted by Johnny.B.Good View Post
    I make fake "fries" all the time as a side dish with a sirloin steak or hamburger using the following recipe from my father.

    You might think that writing this first bit down, something so simple and obvious, isn’t worth the effort. But it’s as easy to do it wrong as right and they are not only very good but foolproof once you get it.

    Ingredients

    - as many russet potatoes as you need
    - olive oil
    - butter
    - salt and pepper to taste

    Preparation

    1. Preheat the oven to 425 degrees.
    2. Using as many potatoes as you need (maybe 1 ½ mid-sized russets per person as a normal side dish), peel them and slice into “jumbo” fries, about ½ inch square and the length of the potatoes. Note: The large size makes them easier to handle in the cooking process (smaller and they tend to break up) and allows you to crisp the outside while leaving the inside soft. When cutting them out of the potato, just throw away any trimmings that are too small to cook properly.
    3. Thoroughly rinse the fries in a colander. Now rinse them again. Now rinse them again and pour the damp potatoes onto a clean cotton towel to dry a bit. If they are not properly rinsed, they will stick to each other and to the cooking pan with a mess the result.
    4. These fries must be cooked in a single layer in a pan or they will steam, not become crisp. In one or more Pyrex or other pans sufficient to hold the potatoes in one layer, enough oil (Canola is tasteless and fine) to just cover the bottom plus a couple of tablespoons of butter. Place the pan in the oven just long enough to melt the butter.
    5. Now place the fries in the pan and gently stir them around to coat with the oil/butter mixture without breaking them up. Arrange in a single layer and sprinkle with salt and pepper.
    6. Roast for a total of about 45 minutes to an hour or until properly browned all to your liking. Shake the pan after the first few minutes of cooking to make sure they don’t stick to the bottom/sides or each other. About 2/3 of the way through the projected cooking time, remove from the oven and gently turn over each fry with tongs to crisp on the other side and avoid breaking them. Replace in the oven and cook until done. Serve immediately.

    Comment

    If you get screwed up on timing the meal, you can delay the potatoes by stopping after you turn them over then not putting them back in the oven until you have about fifteen minutes to go with the other elements (and fifteen minutes on the potatoes too). I’ve done it many times and it’s not a problem. They do have to be served immediately after coming out of the oven to be best.
    My wife and I do pretty much this sans butter. We like this a lot.

  4. #14
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    This advice is great, but I will just add that I saw a french fry recipe in cook's illustrated for crispy fries that only fry once.

    Just an option if you want to try it out.

    k.

    Cut and paste job here....

    Published July 1, 2009. From Cook's Illustrated.

    WHY THIS RECIPE WORKS:
    When we wanted a french fry recipe with half the oil and no double frying, we tried submerging the potatoes in cold oil before frying them over high heat until browned. With lower-starch potatoes like Yukon Golds, the result was a crisp exterior and a creamy interior.

    SERVES 3 TO 4
    Flavoring the oil with bacon fat (optional) gives the fries a mild meaty flavor. We prefer peanut oil for frying, but vegetable or canola oil can be substituted. This recipe will not work with sweet potatoes or russets. Serve with dipping sauces (see related recipes), if desired. See "Cutting Potatoes for French Fries," below, for help on cutting even batons.
    INGREDIENTS
    2 1/2pounds Yukon Gold potatoes (about 6 medium), scrubbed, dried, sides squared off, and cut lengthwise into 1/4-inch by 1/4-inch batons (see note)
    6cups peanut oil
    1/4cup bacon fat , strained (optional) (see note)
    Kosher salt
    INSTRUCTIONS
    1. Combine potatoes, oil, and bacon fat (if using) in large Dutch oven. Cook over high heat until oil has reached rolling boil, about 5 minutes. Continue to cook, without stirring, until potatoes are limp but exteriors are beginning to firm, about 15 minutes.
    2. Using tongs, stir potatoes, gently scraping up any that stick, and continue to cook, stirring occasionally, until golden and crisp, 5 to 10 minutes longer. Using skimmer or slotted spoon, transfer fries to thick paper bag or paper towels. Season with salt and serve immediately.
    RECIPE TESTING

    GIVING FAT THE COLD SHOULDER


    Our easier approach to cooking French fries does not preheat the oil and calls for one prolonged frying instead of the quicker double-dip in hot oil used in the classic method. But does the lengthy exposure to oil lead to a greasier fry?

    EXPERIMENT
    We prepared two batches of fries using Yukon Gold potatoes, our preferred spud for the cold-start method. We cooked one batch the conventional way, heating 3 quarts of peanut oil to 325 degrees and frying 2½ pounds of potatoes until just beginning to color, removing them, increasing the oil temperature to 350 degrees, then returning the potatoes to the pot to fry until golden brown. Total exposure to oil: less than 10 minutes. The second batch we cooked according to our working method, submerging 2½ pounds of spuds in 6 cups of cold oil and cooking over high heat for about 25 minutes, with the oil temperature never rising above 280 degrees. We then sent samples from each batch to an independent lab to analyze the fat content.

    RESULTS
    Our cold-start spuds contained about one third less fat than spuds deep-fried twice the conventional way: 13 versus 20 percent.

    EXPLANATION
    Fries absorb oil two ways. As the potatoes cook, they lose moisture near their surface, which is replaced by oil. Then, as they cool after being removed from the hot grease, oil from their exterior gets pulled in. Because our cold-start method cooks the fries more gently, less moisture is lost (but enough so the fries stay crisp) and less oil is absorbed during frying. Plus, this approach exposes the spuds to just one cool-down, versus the two cooling-off periods of the classic method, so less oil gets absorbed after cooking as well.


    COLD OIL
    13% FAT

    DOUBLE FRY
    20% FAT
    RECIPE TESTING

    KEYS TO EASIER CRISP FRENCH FRIES


    The classic technique for French fries involves four steps: rinsing the cut potatoes, soaking them in ice water, and then deep-frying—twice—in quarts of hot oil. Our method calls for just one round of frying and a lot less oil.


    1. LESS OIL Our fries cook in just 6 cups of oil instead of 2 or 3 quarts.

    2. COLD START Beginning with room-temperature oil gives fries time to cook through before their exteriors crisp.

    3. ONE FRY Potatoes are fried only once, for about 25 minutes, rather than twice.
    TECHNIQUE

    CUTTING POTATOES FOR FRENCH FRIES


    1. Square off potato by cutting a 1/4-inch-thick slice from each of its 4 long sides.

    2. Cut potato lengthwise into 1/4-inch planks.

    3. Stack 3 to 4 planks and cut into 1/4-inch batons. Repeat with remaining planks.
    "There's only one thing I hate more than lying…skim milk, which is water that's lying about being milk." -- Ron Swanson

  5. #15
    Senior Member Johnny.B.Good's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by UCChemE05 View Post
    My wife and I do pretty much this sans butter. We like this a lot.
    I sprinkle them with paprika too for a bit more color. Simple, crispy, delicious. Throw them in the oven for 45 minutes, pull them out, and finish for 15 when you are getting close with whatever else you are eating. He has a recipe for the real McCoy too, but this is easy and good I never feel like experimenting.

  6. #16
    Senior Member Crothcipt's Avatar
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    wow I have only seen pics of Modernist Cuisine. I am glad to know there is someone that has at least read it, own it. Nothing like a over 500$ cookbook.

  7. #17
    Senior Member Deckhand's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Andrew H View Post
    From Modernist Cuisine: "The Perfect Fry"
    Cut potatoes into batons and rinse them to get rid of surface starch. Vacuum-seals them in a plastic bag, in one even layer, with water. Heat the bag to 212 degrees for 15 minutes, steaming the batons. Then hit the bag with ultrasound to cavitate the water—45 minutes on each side. Reheat the bag in an oven to 212 degrees for five minutes, and put the hot fries on a rack in a vacuum chamber, and then blanche them in 338-degree oil for three minutes. When they’re cool, deep fry the potatoes in oil at 375 degrees until they’re crisp, about three more minutes, and then drain them on paper towels. Total preparation time: two hours.

    Or you could just blanch in 325 oil and finish in 375. Your choice
    That's an expensive book

  8. #18
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    http://blogs.kqed.org/essentialpepin...special-spuds/

    Saw these on public tv looks good.

  9. #19
    For the double fry method, russets seem to be the way to go, how important is the oil/lard choice? Peanut oil, canola, crisco, lard... I imagine there are slight flavor differences, what the most popular?

    Thanks for the great tips! Gonna try the oven method as well!


    Feel free to visit my website, http://www.rodrigueknives.com
    Email pierre@rodrigueknives.com

  10. #20
    Quote Originally Posted by Johnny.B.Good View Post
    I sprinkle them with paprika too for a bit more color. Simple, crispy, delicious. Throw them in the oven for 45 minutes, pull them out, and finish for 15 when you are getting close with whatever else you are eating. He has a recipe for the real McCoy too, but this is easy and good I never feel like experimenting.
    I'll have to try the paprika. I've tried it with garlic and dried garlic before but of course they both ended up being burnt with no garlic flavor left by the time the fries were done. Have thought about experimenting by giving the first a 2nd toss in garlic with oil ~10-15 min before they're done. ...or I guess I could always break out the Lawry's

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