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  1. #1

    echerub's Avatar
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    Chopping on a board with feet?

    Hey guys

    I'm thinking of picking up a chopping cleaver to chop up whole, bone-in chicken, duck, whatever. However, I've always been a little hesitant to get a cleaver for this because I wonder if that's okay to do on a Boardsmith board with feet.

    I could get a cheapie edge grain board just for chopping, but I'm not sure how well that's going to fly with my wife She's already nixed my suggestion to replace our one and only $20 non-stick wok which is no longer non-stick, so adding another board when I've got others that are perfectly good probably won't go over well.

    (Notice that getting a whole new knife is not an issue - a cleaver just looks like another cleaver Probably gonna pick up a CCK chopper.)

    So...

    Is it alright to chop on an end-grain board on feet? Or would I eventually put too much stress on the joints between the wood that I'm going to cause problems with the board?
    Len

  2. #2
    Senior Member Mucho Bocho's Avatar
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    Len, Check this one out

    http://www.wokshop.com/HTML/products...ing-block.html

    Looks like a real deal chinese chopping block. Like the ones found in china Town

  3. #3

    echerub's Avatar
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    I thought about getting an actual chopping block, but I'd really be in trouble if I did that. I already got a "more? really?" when I said yesterday that I need to get more mixing bowls
    Len

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    Senior Member Mucho Bocho's Avatar
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    HAHA. The screw it then, just wail the piss out of the boards you have intil they're trashed. These chinese ones are very cool if you have the storage for them. I'd love to get a propper bone clever some day.

  5. #5
    Sponsors Dream Burls's Avatar
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    I'd be interested to hear what Dave has to say about this. I'd be very surprise if it were a problem. Maybe a baseball bat might be too much, but I'd think these boards could take a cleaver. Dave????
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  6. #6
    Senior Member Notaskinnychef's Avatar
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    I'd also assume that there wouldn't be any issue. Granted I don't know for sure, but provided you had one with a decent thickness (say 2 inch and up) I'd feel fine smashing away

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    The glue joints are stronger than the wood, if that is what you are worried about.
    Spike C
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  8. #8
    Marko Tsourkan's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by echerub View Post
    I thought about getting an actual chopping block, but I'd really be in trouble if I did that. I already got a "more? really?" when I said yesterday that I need to get more mixing bowls
    cleaver marks will be deeper on your Boardsmith than knife marks, so you will probably regret it as soon as you see them.

    Feet are good for chopping, as you get some shock absorption. Real butcher blocks are up to 2' tall, and weigh a ton.

    I would use a block on top of your Boardsmith for chopping.

    M


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  9. #9
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    I'm with Marko on this one.

    About a year ago, I was given a thick cleaver. The first night I used it was to whack some smoked chickens (maybe 5 or 6), and it definitely left some marks. If your technique is gentle (pressing down and moving the cleaver in a rocking motion to get through the meat instead of whacking), the cuts might not be as deep.

    I'm glad I used an older board--no way would I do that on a Boardsmith, or anything I wanted to keep in good shape. I'd use an older board, or buy a cheaper one (like the ones Mucho Bocho suggested) for that purpose. Probably just bring it out when needed.

  10. #10

    echerub's Avatar
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    Okay, sounds like I'm gonna have to get a cheapie board at least to place on top of my Boardsmith. I'd rather take the momentary pain of having to explain why there's a new board in the house than the longer-term pain of gouging out my good boards.

    Hmm. If I have to explain the purchase anyways, maybe I should get a proper butcher block
    Len

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