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Thread: My Gastronomy...

  1. #21
    Quote Originally Posted by stereo.pete View Post
    I also appreciate simple well-executed cooking. In fact, the most important factor is the taste at the end of the day.
    I totally agree

  2. #22
    Senior Member Lucretia's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Peco View Post
    Maybe some are like that but not all. This guy spent several hundred hours preparing his ultimate "dish" until he reached what I would call perfection. On top of that he spent 1000's of dollars on the best ingredients. Became 3rd, runner up and eventually a winner. In my world this guy is what it's all about = love and passion for food!

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PVrPJWFdx54
    Once I got past the "I am deep! I like sheep!" And I skateboard, too!" intro (set to dramatic music, no less) the food looked good. Seems like there's a fine line between a dish that's about the food and one that's about the chef showing off--and it's very subjective. When it becomes more about the chef than the food I lose interest.

  3. #23
    Quote Originally Posted by Lucretia View Post
    Once I got past the "I am deep! I like sheep!" And I skateboard, too!" intro (set to dramatic music, no less) the food looked good. Seems like there's a fine line between a dish that's about the food and one that's about the chef showing off--and it's very subjective. When it becomes more about the chef than the food I lose interest.
    I understand your point and I agree. That said, this was an introvideo made for the chef who represented Denmark at Bocuse d'or (other countries made their own as well). In real life this guy is very humble and rather quiet (at least in public where I've seen him on several occations)!

  4. #24
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    He was not very humble or quiet, when he was complaining about not getting any stars though..

    Lars

  5. #25
    That's called ambition and dissapointment ... also it does not make sence not to give stars to a world champ - I would complain too!

  6. #26
    Sorry for messing up your thread B, admins are welcome to delete my responses, will not post any more comments. Great food by the way

  7. #27
    Thanks for all responses, I have no problems about where the discussion is going, if it only doesnt go the personal attacking way.

    This is forum peco and here I think its for dialogue.

    But into the subject.

    I knew someone would brought this up or some other uncomparable stuff. What I mean is.

    A) I cook food people is going to eat, drink wine with and hopefully enjoy the moment to the fullest. He is cooking food for the jury to taste and the rest is going to hell.
    So now, if there for example 20 teams, the jury have a pretty tough job.

    B) He is a world champion? But who said so? Couple of old farts? Did you see books of Paul Bocuse? Do you like his style? [half a bunch of parsley and 6 carrots per plate?]
    And in two years after winning he cannot compete, cannot defend the title. So someone else wins, is he worlds best no longer then?
    Think a little, is the world really remember champions, or the Bocuses name?

    You got some definition here wrong. I dont think Bocuse D'or is world championships.
    Of course, You and I are from countries where chefs have small di ck complex, cause world was thinking and still thinks Scandinavia or eastern Europe is gastro shiteholes. So Its good for your ego to have "world champion".

    In the same time I cannot help feeling really great chefs are too busy working their asses off in own restaurant/working for someone.
    Im yet to wait for some 3 Star chef to start in the competition, but what would he gain?

    And this brings us to C:
    Why didnt he get stars? There are many factors why chefs dont, lack of consistency is one of the reasons. In restaurant business, is little different than when you have 2 years to prepare, isnt true?

    on the other hand, when Ducasse opened few years back new place in London, first year gained 2 stars - which is already unusual. Second year got 3 stars already. This was quite big story as there was Marcus Wareing fighting for 3 stars and preparing few years for it. Didnt got it. Why? Think for yourself

    As to the food from video, I think some stuff looks impressive, great clean and neat presentation, but the fried sausage-looking thing is grouse and the hat hes wearing, I hate chefs hats.
    Its great he won, I think it would take a lot of motivating to work 2 years and not a single service, no excitement, just labour. So totally strong will on hes behalf. And big respect to the fella. Still, not a world champion for me, noone will ever beat Nico Ladenis in eating stuff. :P

  8. #28
    B, good feedback.

    Well, everyone has their own opinion about food and the guy preparing it. Also there are different opinions on the Bocuse d'or. Personally I think that it's great BUT not for all chefs - stars or not. You have to appreciate the element of competition to be great in this field. Maybe some 3 star chefs don't have the balls, guts, nerves etc. to particepate because of the huge pressure and time involved. Maybe they just want to work in their restaurant and try to maintain or get another star? Rasmus did both - ran his restaurant, prepared for - and particepated. Does it make him better - maybe not, but what he achived no one can take away from him = bronce, silver and gold ... he also got a star at one point as far as I remember.

    Stars and chefs: Well as a Scandinavian you should know the worlds best restaurant NOMA, located in Copenhagen. Rene doesn't compete in Bocuse d'or. He compete with himself ... being innovative, thinking out of the box etc. Does this world title make him the best chef in the world? I don't know? But if you can make people cook their own egg and get paid well, at least you are very clever and innovative. Also he's a big part of why Nordic cuisine is back on the map - respect to him! Would I pay 2.000 dkkr to eat there? Well probably not.

    I myself like a good steak, bread etc. what I would call "regular" food - as you showed in this thread. Still, when cooking stuff like this I feel like a guy from minor league when comparing food like this with food the major league guys presents/construct. Can those guys cook what you and I do - hell yaeh, they did that as apprentices - and I'm sure their outcome would be better than yours and mine!

    Food can be discussed but many times it can't be agreed upon. We all have different taste and preferences. But that's what so great being a chef, you can study, play, be creative and maybe be "lucky" enough to create something new, tasty, goodlooking and grounbreaking food. Being a chef is not flipping burgers. In my mind it's science, skills and lot's of practise.

  9. #29
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    mr drinky's Avatar
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    I love our Scandinavian forum members. They disagree in the most polite way. +1 for Nordic civility.

    I'm just waiting for Oivind to drink a bit too much and come in and shake things up

    k.
    "There's only one thing I hate more than lying…skim milk, which is water that's lying about being milk." -- Ron Swanson

  10. #30
    Senior Member DK chef's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by mr drinky View Post
    I love our Scandinavian forum members. They disagree in the most polite way. +1 for Nordic civility.

    I'm just waiting for Oivind to drink a bit too much and come in and shake things up

    k.
    hehe

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