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Thread: Smokers

  1. #21
    Senior Member Crothcipt's Avatar
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    I now so want to take that in to work. Show how extreme my problem isn't yet.

  2. #22
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    Do any of those cleavers get much use or is it mostly just a really cool collection?

  3. #23
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    Impressed!

    Hax thee Cook CLEAVERS RULE!!!
    A barbeque believer will not profane pork by boiling, liquid-smoking, submeging in sous-vide, or affirm with those who do.

  4. #24

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    I come from Kentucky originally and their ain't no BBQ there either..........unless you count sheep as BBQ. ;-)
    Quote Originally Posted by hax9215 View Post
    PARBOILING RIBS?? No BBQ in Florida either, apparently. No offense, but there is a reason a lot of the competition guys's excess. btw, I align my smoker on a back azimuth to Memphis, not magnetic North!


    Hax the Cook CLEAVERS RULE!!!

  5. #25
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    I would maintain that only in Kentucky could a pitmaster effectively smoke sheep! (For all of you yankees, Owensboro style BBQ utilizes mutton.) Seriously, parboiling? HERESY!! DE-VIL!! DE-VIL!! BLAS-PHEMERRR!!!! ;-(p

    Hax the Cook CLEAVERS RULE!!!
    A barbeque believer will not profane pork by boiling, liquid-smoking, submeging in sous-vide, or affirm with those who do.

  6. #26

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    Quote Originally Posted by Kyle View Post
    Do any of those cleavers get much use or is it mostly just a really cool collection?
    I use two smaller old beattys almost every day, size 0 nd 2. That big boy is a #10 and has only been used to behead some large fish that has hit my dock. I also have a few lamb splitters that get used a lot. But to fully answer the question I have been trying to collect one of each size of Beatty in as good a shape as I can find.
    This got harder when I learned that not only were there the "Beatty and son" cleavers made from cast steel that most of you know of, made from around 1820's-1900. In around 1940 one of the Beatty's daughters marred a mr. Briddell from that point on all the knives were stamped Briddell. But a older (also cast steel) cleavers made by the stamped " W. Beatty PA". These were made from around 1720-1750, he was the grandfather of the William Beatty from Beatty and son.
    But hold on I'm not done yet a even older cast steel cleaver made by John Beaty from around 1680-1720, stamped "J Beatty Ulster Co NY" that's the one in the picture above.
    AND! From what i can tell the oldest Beatty cleavers made stamped "Thomas Beatty Forged Down Co. Ireland 1662". If I'm right these were made by the great great grand uncle of the "Beatty and sons" in county down Ireland. I found this cleaver in a antique store in PA thing looks like it was never used, funny my oldest Beatty is the one in the best condition.

    So there's lots of Beatty's out there.

  7. #27
    Senior Member Deckhand's Avatar
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    Really cool info. Great collection.

  8. #28
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    Quote Originally Posted by Chef Niloc View Post
    I use two smaller old beattys almost every day, size 0 nd 2. That big boy is a #10 and has only been used to behead some large fish that has hit my dock. I also have a few lamb splitters that get used a lot. But to fully answer the question I have been trying to collect one of each size of Beatty in as good a shape as I can find.
    This got harder when I learned that not only were there the "Beatty and son" cleavers made from cast steel that most of you know of, made from around 1820's-1900. In around 1940 one of the Beatty's daughters marred a mr. Briddell from that point on all the knives were stamped Briddell. But a older (also cast steel) cleavers made by the stamped " W. Beatty PA". These were made from around 1720-1750, he was the grandfather of the William Beatty from Beatty and son.
    But hold on I'm not done yet a even older cast steel cleaver made by John Beaty from around 1680-1720, stamped "J Beatty Ulster Co NY" that's the one in the picture above.
    AND! From what i can tell the oldest Beatty cleavers made stamped "Thomas Beatty Forged Down Co. Ireland 1662". If I'm right these were made by the great great grand uncle of the "Beatty and sons" in county down Ireland. I found this cleaver in a antique store in PA thing looks like it was never used, funny my oldest Beatty is the one in the best condition.

    So there's lots of Beatty's out there.

    Wow, I knew the Beatty history goes pretty far back and can be confusing at some points with fathers and sons and cousins all manufacturing cleavers under the Beatty name at the same time, but I had no idea it went as far back as the 1600s.

    Is there a good source for Beatty info or is that everything you figured out with your own research and digging? The history of these cleavers is truly fascinating. I have one I need to restore and use and I'm always on the lookout for more. I wish I could find one in a shop and not just have to buy on ebay, it kind of takes the fun out of it.

  9. #29

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    Quote Originally Posted by Kyle View Post
    Wow, I knew the Beatty history goes pretty far back and can be confusing at some points with fathers and sons and cousins all manufacturing cleavers under the Beatty name at the same time, but I had no idea it went as far back as the 1600s.

    Is there a good source for Beatty info or is that everything you figured out with your own research and digging? The history of these cleavers is truly fascinating. I have one I need to restore and use and I'm always on the lookout for more. I wish I could find one in a shop and not just have to buy on ebay, it kind of takes the fun out of it.
    There is a few articles out there that I have read, one was called "passing down the Beattys" I just looked it up from a link I saved and it looks like you have to pay to use the sight now. My wife is into all that genealogy stuff, she's in these club like society things, daughters of the American revolution, mayflower society. Any way she has this cool database thing that I looked up a bunch of things. Wouldn't you know it I'm a Beatty, on my fathers mothers side! It's funny I collected these cleavers all these years and never new it.

    On line shopping is the easey way to go but the best stuff is siting on shelves in old peoples shops that don't even own computers.

  10. #30

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    I am partial to ceramic bbq pits, however I can see how they would be difficult(if not impossible) to use in a commercial kitchen.

    I used to compete KCBS around eastern Pennsylvania a few years ago. We used to haul 3 Kamados like the one below on a Bobcat trailer to competitions. With a BBQ Guru temperature controller and extruded coconut charcoal, we could maintain 235 - 250F for the 18-20 hours needed to finish briskets.

    The #9 Kamado below weighs about 750 pounds and was sinking into the macadam driveway until we move it on to concrete pads. The capacity is about 85 pounds (3x briskets and 5x pork butts). My wood preference is a mixture of Pecan and Cherry. -Doug

    Last edited by Doug Seward; 03-04-2012 at 12:22 PM. Reason: Fix Photo link

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