Quantcast
Thinning, what is it, and why is it important
Page 1 of 3 123 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 25

Thread: Thinning, what is it, and why is it important

  1. #1
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Location
    London UK
    Posts
    106

    Question Thinning, what is it, and why is it important

    I've seen a few references to thinning the blade during knife sharpening, however I can't find any information on what this means, why it is important, or how you would go about doing it.

    So please can someone enlighten me?
    :beg:

  2. #2
    over time, this is what will help you maintain edge geometry over time... i have some images on my work computer that would help out with this, but as i'm not there, it might be a few days before i get to post them.

  3. #3
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Location
    Boston
    Posts
    611
    as your sharpen your knife, the edge works its way down to the spine. Knives are designed such that they taper from the spine down to the edge and repeated sharpenings will eventually cause the area above the edge to be thick and as a result, cause wedging. hope that helps

  4. #4
    Senior Member Benuser's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Location
    Amstelveen, The Netherlands
    Posts
    2,100
    I would add that just a few sharpening sessions without thinning will cause a noticeable loss of performance. The good news is that thinning behind the edge is very easy and give almost an instant performance boost. It's done by sharpening at a little more acute angle than the one you used with the very edge. Use a marker to see where you are removing material.
    When you're dealing with asymmetric knives (left side flat, right one convex) thinning behind the edge is normally done at the right side only; the flat side should remain flat.

  5. #5
    Senior Member

    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Location
    Pensacola, FL, USA
    Posts
    3,893
    Maybe this image will help:



    It is reproduced from a good article on sharpening which is worth reading:

    http://forums.egullet.org/index.php?...nd-sharpening/

    Rick

  6. #6
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Location
    Melbourne
    Posts
    619
    Thanks for posting that link PT, that guy should probably write a book on kitchen knives!

  7. #7
    Senior Member

    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Location
    Pensacola, FL, USA
    Posts
    3,893
    Quote Originally Posted by Dusty View Post
    Thanks for posting that link PT, that guy should probably write a book on kitchen knives!

  8. #8
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Location
    London UK
    Posts
    106
    Thx for the link, it was enlightening. though didn't really cover thinning I think. I wonder if we can get permission to reproduce that article and add it to the encyclopaedia here

  9. #9
    Senior Member

    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Location
    Pensacola, FL, USA
    Posts
    3,893
    Quote Originally Posted by dragonlord View Post
    Thx for the link, it was enlightening. though didn't really cover thinning I think. I wonder if we can get permission to reproduce that article and add it to the encyclopaedia here
    What about thinning isn't covered by this paragraph?

    "The back bevel also solves one of the great problems with V-edges, the fact that the metal behind the edge gets progressively thicker as the knife is sharpened over time. The knife doesn’t cut as well and becomes harder and harder to sharpen. The answer is to grind the shoulders off the edge at an acute angle, i.e. add a back bevel, then reestablish the primary bevel."

    Rick

  10. #10
    Senior Member stevenStefano's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Location
    Norn Iron
    Posts
    1,391
    I would be interested in seeing how different people carry out thinning. I have done it pretty heavily to a couple of my knives and it worked out great, but I have seen other people with different ideas about how it should be done and certain ways to do it. I used trial and error basically and apart from the scratches, it worked out great. It also added much needed convexity to the left sides of my knives due to me being a lefty

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •