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Thread: Does anybody brine brisket?

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    Senior Member euphorbioid's Avatar
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    Question Does anybody brine brisket?

    I am planning on cooking a 15 pound brisket in a Big Green Egg. I have cooked several before that have come out pretty good. I am wondering if I could get a little more moist meat if I brined the brisket prior to cooking. I have cooked them for 15-18 hours and everybody has been happy, but there is always room for improvement.
    Thanks,
    Jan

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    Senior Member rockbox's Avatar
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    No need to brine. If you do it right, the brisket will be moist on its own. If you brine it, it will become Montreal/Canadian smoked meat which is a mix between between corned beef and brisket.
    "Insanity: doing the same thing over and over again and expecting different results." --Albert Einstein

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    I've never heard of anyone brining a brisket for BBQ purposes.

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    I would think that a drip pan under the meat would do a lot to help with moisture. Maybe with beer or wine in the pan.
    Spike C
    "The Buddha resides as comfortably in the circuits of a digital computer or the gears of a cycle transmission as he does at the top of a mountain."
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    Senior Member FryBoy's Avatar
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    Doug Collins
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    Senior Member rockbox's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by euphorbioid View Post
    I am planning on cooking a 15 pound brisket in a Big Green Egg. I have cooked several before that have come out pretty good. I am wondering if I could get a little more moist meat if I brined the brisket prior to cooking. I have cooked them for 15-18 hours and everybody has been happy, but there is always room for improvement.
    Thanks,
    Jan

    The whole 18 hour thing is overrated. There is no need to cook it that long. I think it stems from the whole Texas mentality of more is better. A bunch guys at a talegate bragging how long the spent fiddling with there smokers. You only need about 8 hours to cook a great brisket, and only 5 hours if you use the high heat method and the Texas crutch.
    "Insanity: doing the same thing over and over again and expecting different results." --Albert Einstein

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    Senior Member joec's Avatar
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    I've never brine a brisket for smoking or even to do in the oven. I do use a rub when smoking though but not in the oven.
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    Joe

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    Senior Member goodchef1's Avatar
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    brine is used to impart flavor through osmosis, does not really add to a juicier end product. just baste throughout process with its drippings

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    I rub my Brisket 12-24 hours before smoking, so yeah, a dry brine.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Jim View Post
    I rub my Brisket 12-24 hours before smoking, so yeah, a dry brine.
    agreed. Brines and cures are interchangeable, however, you will get stronger flavors by rubbing a piece of meat with spices, salt and sugar than you would by boiling the spices in a salt:sugar water mixture. If I am doing bbqs,, I would almost always dry rub (good for crust reasons too!) with spices salt and sugar... But if I am poaching a chicken breast, I am going to boil together some vegetables and whole spices, let it steep, cool, and brine. Off topic I know, but im in the rambling mood; when I am making a vegetable based brine like that, i will do something like this:

    Boil down white wine with mirepoix, herbs (parleys, thyme, bay) and spices (black peppercorn, allspice, clove, fennel seed) to a sec
    Add all the salt for your brine ratio (I use 2C salt per gallon) This is a lot of salt for this amount of vegetables. They will release so much of their liquid that they will cover themselves.
    Add enough water to make this mixture a half gallon, bring to a boil, take off heat and add 1C sugar and steep half an hour
    strain and add half gallon of ice

    This is a brine for fresh meat not for curing hams or any other kind of salumi. I have left some chicken legs in this brine for almost a week and they weren't too salty, they were great.

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