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  1. #11
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    The Italian government recommends using a stand mixer because of the 30 minute kneading. I also mostly cook in a 500º oven on a pizza stone on the bottom rack, unless I'm using the BGE.
    Spike C
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  2. #12
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    Seems like I haven't been kneading my pizza dough enough. I'll have to give this a shot in the mixer sometime, as I've never been that thrilled with the crusts I make myself. They typically seem somewhat like thick pitas, I could never get the kind of rise out of them I want.

  3. #13
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    All this talk takes me back to my youth, working at a pizzaria and delivery boy.

    I'm looking around to get a Cordierite stone for my oven to start making some home made pizzas.

  4. #14
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    I use Peter Rienhart's recipe. I don't have it in front of me but it is about 70% hydration 1% yeast and some salt.
    There isn't much kneading. You do four cycles of kneading for 2 minutes and rest for 10.
    The neat part is that you retard the rise by keeping the dough in the fridge. you have four days to use it with the best flavor on day 3. When you are ready to bake you just proof the dough for 90 minutes and shape it.
    I bake in the oven at 550 I'm using a cast iron "pizza stone" that makes a great crispy crust.
    "Experience" is what you get when you don't get what you want.

  5. #15
    Mr. Hospitality! UnConundrum's Avatar
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    You can't make a 80% hydration dough in the mixer. Well, you can, but you'll have close to a batter and not a dough that comes together like by hand... The added hydration adds to the lightness of the dough as the water expands, turns to steam, and evaporates.

  6. #16
    Das HandleMeister apicius9's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by chazmtb View Post
    All this talk takes me back to my youth, working at a pizzaria and delivery boy.

    I'm looking around to get a Cordierite stone for my oven to start making some home made pizzas.

    Okay, time to expand my vocabulary: What on earth is this? I still haven't gotten my act together to get a stone for the oven, I was thinking granite because my local HD doesn't even have fire bricks (I guess they don't build too many fire places in Hawaii...). But I am still open to alternatives as long as I don't have to ship them in for a fortune...

    Stefan

  7. #17
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    Stefan,
    The material is high temperature ceramic mineral mix that is used to line kiln and commercial baking ovens. They are known as kiln shelves. Cost around 40 for a 20x20x.75 shelf. There are other sizes and round ones too. A 15" round is around 20. Check them out at your local pottery supply store. Make sure it is an entreated kind. It is heavy. I am going to cut mine down to a 20x16 size to fit my oven. Heat it up for an hour at 500 and you are ready to go. These are more durable than pizza stones and don't tend to crack.

  8. #18
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    Nice crust!

    Personally, I use a modified no-knead pizza recipe started by Jim Lahey. It's easy to make because it doesn't require kneading the dough. However, it's hard to work with because it's extremely wet and is best after a three (3) day cold rise so you can't make it and cook it the same day.

    My trick to using this wet dough is to flour it heavily on the outside after taking it out of the refrigerator, and then shaping the dough on parchment paper. Because it's so wet, it will stick in about one (1) minute after putting it on a peel if it's not really heavily floured on the bottom (which can also lead to a floury bottom - not good). I use a pizza stone in my DCS stove cranked up to 550 and I get a pretty good crust still. Nothing like a BGE or wood oven, but it's good enough for me until I'm able to get either a BGE (or similar cooker) or a wood oven (after a sack of money falls out of the sky into my lap).

    I highly recommend checking out Slice on seriouseats.com. They have great recipes for all things pizza, including a homemade sausage receipe I need to try as well as various pizza sauce recipes and dough recipes for all types of pizza, e.g. Sicilian, Neopolitan, and reviews of brands of cheese. There are also pizza making forums as well that can assist you.

  9. #19
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    Or let them rise longer. Try letting them rise in the refrigerator after kneading for a day.

  10. #20
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    Stefan,

    Don't use granite. They tend to crack easily if heated. If you want, go get a unglazed Terra Cotta planter dish at Home Depot. I think there are 15" rounds that fit most ovens. It is not ideal, but it might work. The kiln shelf are the best options. There has to be something in Oahu that sells pottery supplies.

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