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Thread: Jigs vs Freehand

  1. #11
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    free hand for me.
    But I am always curious what a jig can do, not spending a ton of money on one though.

  2. #12
    Senior Member riverie's Avatar
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    Free hand without a question for me too. I believe with free hand you can feel your knife much better. The characteristic, hardness, edge, etc... For me it's part of the fun besides cutting stuff with it.

  3. #13

    JBroida's Avatar
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    i'm also a freehand guy... i would be all for jigs if they did what i wanted them to do, but so far, i cant find one that allows me the flexibility to do what i need... that and sharpening is like zen for me

  4. #14
    Marko Tsourkan's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by JBroida View Post
    i'm also a freehand guy... i would be all for jigs if they did what i wanted them to do, but so far, i cant find one that allows me the flexibility to do what i need... that and sharpening is like zen for me
    Free hand for knives, a jig for my saya chisels. Those have tiny bevels, so keeping a constant angle is next to impossible.

    M


    "All beauty that has no foundation in use, soon grows distasteful and needs continuous replacement with something new." The Shakers' saying.

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  5. #15

    JBroida's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Marko Tsourkan View Post
    Free hand for knives, a jig for my saya chisels. Those have tiny bevels, so keeping a constant angle is next to impossible.

    M
    i guess i should have specified that i was talking about knives... i think for tools, etc. there are tools that work very well. My bad. Clearly i'm a knife guy

  6. #16
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    mr drinky's Avatar
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    I was all prepared to go the edge pro route, then I went onto KF and was talked out of it (in a good way). There were both people who liked it and those who liked free hand. In the end it came down to looking at my personality. I love doing things precisely, whether that be in sports, mowing the lawn, exercising, cooking etc. and I don't like using contraptions/jigs hardly ever (in whatever I do). Why would knives be any different? And even though I cook a lot I still don't own a food processor or stand mixer -- but there are times it would be nice to own one and I think about getting one quite often.

    An edge pro is the same way. A friend of mine has one and he loves it for reprofiling knives, and I could definitely see times that I would appreciate it and use it. I was wowed by the consistency of his bevels on jobs that would take me hours. There are a couple of 'labor of love' knives in my drawer right now that I would probably have in better shape if I had an edge pro or some other jig.

    In the end, I decided to go the stone route and said to myself that I would invest in a jig when the time comes and the utility was there -- but I have also been saying that with a kitchen aid mixer for 10 years now. And even though I am a precise person, I love the imprecision of sharpening by hand. It was my first mistake in reprofiling where I learned more about asymmetric bevels. And if I didn't have those scratches in my blades, I would not have invested in learning about polishing blades. Each misstep is a new learning opportunity about the blade -- and another opportunity to get some kit

    I'm free hand for now -- and probably until my back gives out.

    k.
    There is a cult of ignorance in the United States...nurtured by the false notion that democracy means that “my ignorance is just as good as your knowledge.” -- Isaac Asimov

  7. #17

    Dave Martell's Avatar
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    On the jigged side....

    Even though I don't care for where they come from , something that I think is a good thing for the user is the recent addition of Shapton stones cut to size to fit the EP. I see these stones as being a perfect fit for this because they are very hard and ungiving with a slow wear rate.

    Choseras are also offered in this application but I don't think they will make such a great fit here because they wear fast (in comparison to EP stock & Shapton Pro stones) and the power of their cut rate is largely obtained through the use of mud sitting on the stone which is reduced by a stone hanging upside down.

    Even worse of a thing would be......gasp.......the cutting of natural stones to use on the EP. Seriously, this should be punishable by law.

  8. #18
    Marko Tsourkan's Avatar
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    I like to use analogy that sharpening is like cooking. If you always following a recipe, you will not be a very confident and a creative cook. To learn something, you have to mess things up a few times and to experiment. I remember re-polishing knives after every scratch I put on them sharpening. Now I just shrug and move one. The knife is sharp and this is all I care about. A few good knives I have, I take extra care when sharpening.

    I also got to say that I am relatively immune to the sharpening obsession. I don't need to achieve a maximum sharpness (I leave my obsessions for other things. It used to be woodworking, now it's grinding metal). I haven't bought every possible diamond spray, powder, felt, leather strops just to get my knives a little bit sharper. I usually finish a knife on a natural stone and it's plenty sharp for me. I sharpen, use a knife for a while, then sharpen again. I like the cycle. It helps to maintain my sharpening skill.

    M


    "All beauty that has no foundation in use, soon grows distasteful and needs continuous replacement with something new." The Shakers' saying.

    If my KKF Inbox is full (or not), please contact me via Email: anvlts@gmail.com

  9. #19
    Senior Member monty's Avatar
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    I have an Edge Pro and loved using it until I began sharpening knives for other folks. Unless you tape each knife that Edge Pro will really scuff a blade up. I found that by the time I put painters tape on each blade, then went through switching stones, etc., I was spending a lot of time NOT sharpening. Up to that point my water stones were used exclusively on my 2 Japanese knives, but one night I was looking down the barrel of 20 knives and I decided that I just didn't want to go through the hassle of taping them all. I do appreciate the precision of the Edge Pro, but due to the amount of sharpening I have been doing I only use water stones now. I should say that I am the farthest thing from a purist. I really have no opinion about which method is the best. I only care about which method is best for me.

  10. #20

    Dave Martell's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by monty View Post
    I only care about which method is best for me.
    I like this.

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