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Thread: Cleaver Question

  1. #11
    Huh back Jay?
    I just stated my personal experience which includes studying at a Chinese mainland cooking school last year.

  2. #12
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    My mizuno gets an orange patina sometimes too. Orange isn't indicative of rust...I could be wrong but when it really rusts you know it is rust. Meat never leaves the orange patina for me acid sometimes does though depending on the steel

  3. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by Noodle Soup View Post
    Huh back Jay?
    I just stated my personal experience which includes studying at a Chinese mainland cooking school last year.
    Let me be clear then, you said, "I have plenty of the high end Japanese cleavers too, just seldom use them as I don't think most of them are as well designed and balanced for Chinese cooking as the Chinese ones." What features or attributes, make a Chinese cleaver, better then a Japanese one? What do you mean by balanced?

    Jay

  4. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by jaybett View Post
    Let me be clear then, you said, "I have plenty of the high end Japanese cleavers too, just seldom use them as I don't think most of them are as well designed and balanced for Chinese cooking as the Chinese ones." What features or attributes, make a Chinese cleaver, better then a Japanese one? What do you mean by balanced?

    Jay
    +1. I'm pretty curious about this, too. I'm not a cleaver guy. I've used a couple of slicers a total of 10-15 min. I'd appreciate a more detailed post, thanks.

  5. #15
    Senior Member Andy777's Avatar
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    Here's the thing, I would personally give my left nut to travel to China, take cooking classes and go on a cleaver shopping spree. For true authentic Chinese cooking of course the Chinese made and designed knives will excel for the task. That is the task for which they are designed.

    At first at least, for most of the people on this forum and others like it, they aren't necessarily looking to cook authentic chinese dishes at home, they want to try a cleaver as a direct replacement for the preferred chef's knife for their regular home cooking. That's not a bad thing, anytime anyone picks up a cleaver for any style of cooking is great in my eyes. I think the design and functionality of a cleaver can work for multiple types and designs of cleavers and any type of cuisine you throw at it. I personally cook Mexican cuisine about half the time with mine. Now if someone is a knifeknut on here they are fans of thin bladed hard steeled ultra sharp gyuto or the american made version whatever you'd call that. The best cleaver upgrade for that type of knife is going to be a thin light(er) hard steeled cleaver. A good cheap alternative will be a thin slicer like a CCK. My understanding is that these super thin slicers aren't your standard everday all purpose knive in China like we use them for here. They are made for fine slicing work. But we are a different bunch here.

  6. #16
    Quote Originally Posted by Andy777 View Post
    My understanding is that these super thin slicers aren't your standard everday all purpose knive in China like we use them for here. They are made for fine slicing work. But we are a different bunch here.
    When I picked up a really thin CCK (not one I've seen on Mark's site), the lady at the store told me it was specialized for dumplings and not what I was looking for. It was exactly what I was looking for, lol, but I went with an even cheaper cleaver.

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