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  1. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by Keith Neal View Post
    Some folks were interested in how long the rhizomes last. The answer appears to be that is doesn't matter. The stuff is being consumed so fast at my house that it couldn't go bad first.



    The microplane is not the right tool, but it is what I have now. Does anyone know where a good sharkskin grater can be had?
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  2. #22
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    I will give that cabbage core a try to see what its like. Has anyone ever served fresh wasabi to a customer who complained and wanted the 'hot' one?

  3. #23
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    i have had customers accuse me of giving them fake wasabi, because real wasabi is neon green and they would never eat here again. real wasabi tends to be ... grey green, but not in a bad way. grate it and seal it for about ten minutes and let the flavors develop, same with the cabbage core. It is less pungent then the powdered stuff. Your job as the chef is to educate. There will always be someone who wants the hot fake stuff because that's all they know.
    I haven't lived the life I wanted, just the lives I needed too at the time.

  4. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by sachem allison View Post
    i have had customers accuse me of giving them fake wasabi, because real wasabi is neon green and they would never eat here again. real wasabi tends to be ... grey green, but not in a bad way. grate it and seal it for about ten minutes and let the flavors develop, same with the cabbage core. It is less pungent then the powdered stuff. Your job as the chef is to educate. There will always be someone who wants the hot fake stuff because that's all they know.
    How did you deal with those customers and did they come around after being explained?

    I've been thinking about trying it but would just be in tears if everyone was thinking they were being cheated! Now I know one restaurant that serves the fake stuff but has the real stuff for $5 extra. As a diner, i feel its kind of cheapo since this isn't a cheap sushi place, however I think it also serves the purpose of not giving it out to people who don't appreciate it, as well as lets them know that there is another option to the fake stuff.

    I'm finding it kind of hard to picture how much wasabi you get out of a root....if you were to estimate what is the food cost of single "serving" of real wasabi, what would you say as a really rough ballpark? Like would $1 per person be accurate of how much it actually costs?

  5. #25
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    I educated them. I brought them a piece of the real wasabi to their table and showed it to them. I treated it like a prized treasure and had it wrapped in a silk cloth and let them know that it was very rare and valuable, that it was flown in special and that I had a very limited quantity and was only sharing it with a few valued customers. people want to be treated special and that little bit of personal service goes along way. You would be surprised how much it calms some people down. People want to be sold things, be a salesman. stores would go broke if you only sold people what they wanted. That restaurant isn't being cheapo, they are creating a demand and recouping their cost at the same time. It makes business sense. If it is rare people want it and they will pay. Even you, the very fact that it intrigues you enough to want to put it on your menu means that the mystique and marketing is working. Is' it worth a hundred bucks a pound? Hell know! Will someone pay that much or more for it? Hell yes! Some just to try it and some because they can and no other reason and the rare few who truly enjoy it.
    Accurate cost, really depends on how much you give them and how much you want to make,. You are going to lose at least 60% of what you bought in just waste( skin, fibers, leaves and such) and that is conservative. That's why they charged $5 extra and that probably is just to break even. Most of those places aren't making a profit off the wasabi and they don't buy enough for everyone to get some. It is for the most part a loss leader. It brings in people because it is a perk the other guy doesn't have. Figure out what you paid for it and figure you are getting a 40% yield on it closer to 35% and then multiply that actual cost times 3 or 4 and than divide it by the portions you get out of it and that is what you will charge for it. complicated huh. So if you get a 100gram piece for a $100 dollars and it yields 40grams it still cost $100 and you want 3 times food cost you would multiply times 3. That means that that 40 grams is now $300 dollars and say you got 60 portions out of it. $300/60=$5 that is what you would charge.
    I haven't lived the life I wanted, just the lives I needed too at the time.

  6. #26
    Senior Member Deckhand's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by sachem allison View Post
    I educated them. I brought them a piece of the real wasabi to their table and showed it to them. I treated it like a prized treasure and had it wrapped in a silk cloth and let them know that it was very rare and valuable, that it was flown in special and that I had a very limited quantity and was only sharing it with a few valued customers. people want to be treated special and that little bit of personal service goes along way. You would be surprised how much it calms some people down. People want to be sold things, be a salesman. stores would go broke if you only sold people what they wanted. That restaurant isn't being cheapo, they are creating a demand and recouping their cost at the same time. It makes business sense. If it is rare people want it and they will pay. Even you, the very fact that it intrigues you enough to want to put it on your menu means that the mystique and marketing is working. Is' it worth a hundred bucks a pound? Hell know! Will someone pay that much or more for it? Hell yes! Some just to try it and some because they can and no other reason and the rare few who truly enjoy it.
    Accurate cost, really depends on how much you give them and how much you want to make,. You are going to lose at least 60% of what you bought in just waste( skin, fibers, leaves and such) and that is conservative. That's why they charged $5 extra and that probably is just to break even. Most of those places aren't making a profit off the wasabi and they don't buy enough for everyone to get some. It is for the most part a loss leader. It brings in people because it is a perk the other guy doesn't have. Figure out what you paid for it and figure you are getting a 40% yield on it closer to 35% and then multiply that actual cost times 3 or 4 and than divide it by the portions you get out of it and that is what you will charge for it. complicated huh. So if you get a 100gram piece for a $100 dollars and it yields 40grams it still cost $100 and you want 3 times food cost you would multiply times 3. That means that that 40 grams is now $300 dollars and say you got 60 portions out of it. $300/60=$5 that is what you would charge.
    This is description is reminding me of high quality ginseng. Used it at the university for finals weeks.

  7. #27
    Senior Member Crothcipt's Avatar
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    Well said son.

  8. #28
    Senior Member Keith Neal's Avatar
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    Thanks for the suggestions. Sharkskin grater on order from Jon.
    If you reach the age of 60 without becoming a curmudgeon, you haven't been paying attention.

  9. #29
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    Thanks Son for the excellent explanation.

  10. #30
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    most thinking I have done all month. i hate math
    I haven't lived the life I wanted, just the lives I needed too at the time.

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