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Thread: Strange Foods Your Mother Used to Cook

  1. #21
    Das HandleMeister apicius9's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Deckhand View Post
    And Hawaii
    Yep!

    My Mom is a decent cook but very conservative and not adventurous at all. My Grandma was not adventurous and a bad cook... But a few things from Grandma I really liked, e.g. Milk soup with roasted bread, yeast dumplings with cooked dried fruit, green pea soup with ham, just very simple country cooking of people who grew up poor. As a kid, I remember my Grandma cutting me a slice of the large country loaf (maybe 20" in diameter) and she always used a small knife like the ones that are being discussed in Karring's thread. The bread was generously buttered and then she poured white sugar on it. When I was a little older, I preferred salt on it. And by the time I hung around local bars, the same rustic bread with schmaltz and salt was what got you through a night of heavy drinking. My Mom made one strange dish I happen to like, 'warm cucumber' which is basically a slightly thinner mashed potato with sour cream, thin slices of English cucumber, and rendered lardons of cured bacon. What's not to like?

    Stefan

  2. #22
    Senior Member Seth's Avatar
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    Well I don't if it's cultural but around here we do scrapple more than spam - thin and crispy. I tend not to admit to this in public either. Guess I'm a wimp.
    Everywhere you go, there you are.

  3. #23

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    Mmmmm.... schmaltz.

    -AJ

  4. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by Seth View Post
    Well I don't if it's cultural but around here we do scrapple more than spam - thin and crispy. I tend not to admit to this in public either. Guess I'm a wimp.
    Scrapple ... includes every thing from the pig but the Oink. For the commercially available product this might be true, but I had a neighbor who made scrapple and it's nothing more than a pork butt, onions and seasonings with corn meal or grits for a binder. Tasted pretty good to me too.

  5. #25
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    Quote Originally Posted by slowtyper View Post
    Spam is great. Thin and crispy or thick and juicy. Spam (well, its chinese-branded brothers) are staples in chinese households and Hong Kong tea houses!
    Probably called luncheon meat in chinese supermarkets and tea houses. Love them to death... I prolly could go a full month eating nothing but crispy fried luncheon meat with white bread

  6. #26
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    Mother used to take leftover fried pork liver, we raised hogs too, ran it through the grinder and mixed it with scrambled eggs for breakfast.
    The sound of it makes most people cringe but it was really quite good.

    I really like bull fries, I'm the cook at our little testicle fry every year.

    Glen

  7. #27
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    Quote Originally Posted by MadMel View Post
    Probably called luncheon meat in chinese supermarkets and tea houses. Love them to death... I prolly could go a full month eating nothing but crispy fried luncheon meat with white bread
    Yep, last year I was eating hotpot and my friend kept asking me to check off luncheon meat but I had no idea what he was saying because he was pronouncing it "lawn-cheong". Burst out laughing when I finally figured out what he was trying to say. He grew up speaking english as his first language but I guess just never heard anyone say it, saw the chinese labels and assumed it was a chinese word...haha

  8. #28

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    MMMM, Scrapple! Love that stuff. My Grandfather used to make it for me when I was a kid. Moved to Cleveland 8 years ago from Pittsburgh and can't find it anywhere up here.

    Jason

  9. #29
    Senior Member lowercasebill's Avatar
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    try this if you can find it http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Goetta i have never had it but i understand it is like scrapple except with oats instead of corn meal..
    and thanks to all of you who posted about hot dog soup. i though i was the only one .. Mom would cube potatoes boil them and pour off most of the water and add milk and hot dog pieces yielding this stock of watered down milk she would 'finish' it by stirring ketchup into the broth and dotting the hot dog pieces with mustard . i served it to my friends once when i was in grad school thinking it was a 'normal' dinner offering .. they refused to eat it , kidnapped me, drove me to south philly and made me buy them all Pat's cheese steaks .
    heading to a big green egg fest in Fla and will take 6 packages of scrapple to serve to the unsuspecting.. i tell them it is a special Philadelphia sausage .

  10. #30
    Senior Member Seth's Avatar
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    I appraise commercial real estate and I once read a report that claimed that Philadelphia's commercial real estate market was strong because Philadelphia is the home of scrapple and cheese steaks. We like to say these things occasionally to see if anyone is reading these reports. Potato hot dog soup sounds, well, ....ummm.....I'm going to take a ride to South Philly.
    Everywhere you go, there you are.

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