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Thread: Old Sheffield Kitchen knives

  1. #21
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    sachem allison's Avatar
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    That cleaver came about after the merger of Gregory Bros. with fenton in 1968 I believe. The slicer I posted was about 80 to 90 years earlier and hand forged instead of machine forged. good to see a comparison even though they are completely different knives
    I haven't lived the life I wanted, just the lives I needed too at the time.

  2. #22

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    Quote Originally Posted by WillC View Post
    They are very nice. I think I will give something a go in the same style. Mmmm damascus integral. I'll keep my eye out on the bay, most of them seem to have ended up in the states.
    I've just scored a little paring knife which is old sheffield stock never handled. Has been handled by Stu Mitchell, I'll find a pic, should be with me by tomorrow. Its not old old though I don't think. And we have no idea of the maker. Could have had plain wood, but liked the jazzy blue. Looks full flat ground but should work fine for paring duties.

    Very Nice!
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  3. #23
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    I got this today, a little treat to cheer myself up. It is a top quality knife, everything lines up, the plunges are even. Stuart did an excellent job of the handle and finish. Not as much distal taper as I would like, but I've become used to extremes. There was about 0.5mm behind the edge, so I did a quick fix of thinning it and cut a 5-7 degree bevel on each side with a diamond plate. Polished this up. It acually held this edge which surprised me. I thought the factory stainless would be on the soft side, but its darn good stuff. I put a tiny acute microbevel on this, stropped it and it takes the tops off hairs and now much less resistance to cutting. Its a nice little knife! Makes me wonder what the steel is, something like sandvic 12c I suspect.

  4. #24
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    Thanks to recent threads on this forum and Son talking about them, I've grown an interest in these older knives. Never actually handled or seen anything like them before.

    I have a scimitar from Son on the way and just ordered these off ebay.



    Will sharpen up and use the chef knife. The butcher's cleaver...I have no use for this that I can think of, but it was cheap and might come in handy some day. (zombies)

  5. #25
    Senior Member Crothcipt's Avatar
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    lol

  6. #26
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    No Sheffield knives but lots of old Sheffield tools (planes/blades, chisels, saws etc..) Quality of the steel that came out of Sheffield worsened after WWII so best to look for knives made pre war. Invariably the makers used Swedish Ore (some of the best ore in the world). I have many bladed tools dating from mid victorian to around 1940 or so, some hit or miss but generally very fine steel, which takes a lovely edge. I'm guessing the steel used for knives would have been similar.

  7. #27
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    Will have you checked out this book yet?
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    I haven't lived the life I wanted, just the lives I needed too at the time.

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