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Thread: How do restaurants make _______ to order?

  1. #11
    Quote Originally Posted by hambone.johnson View Post
    the majority of places do make rissotto this way, the best way i have found is to almost cook the rissotto DRY durring the par blanch phase. this way the starchy liquid doesnt solidify with your rice durring cooling. that starchy liquid can make your reheated product more challenging as well becuase it doesnt make the rissotto very creamy and clean it makes it starchy. so if you do it make sure to use a rubber spatula, and stir it a lot and get almost all the water out of it before laying it on a sheet tray with a SILPAT, dont use parchment paper cause the paper gets soggy, then put it in the walk-in.

    if you are cooking to order its usually in a coursed out pre-designed menu from a station that is set up to do that. So the rissotto might be the 5th course in an 8 course menu and its fired immediatly upon order and the person cooking it usually doesnt have anything to do with courses 3 or 4 or maybee even 2,3,4 to allow them to keep up with the order.

    generally if your doing pre-cooking for most anything you need to think of the food as a "blanching" stage. Blanch and shock all the food so the time it takes to pivk it up when its ordered and to be plated is less than 7 or 8 minutes. so if you need mushrooms, you would sear them in a hot pan in oil/butter, drain them and cool them, then for service they are added to whatever you need to for pick up. Assembly is the same way. if you go to a wine bar or whatever and they have a flatbread pizza, chances are its already assembles on a flatbread dough that has been blanched off and topped with the stuff that needs to get hot. then onto a pan and in the oven, garnishes are added after cooking and out to the table.
    Lets straighten risotto thing out. I dont think it is possible to cook it totally to order. Lets say you have 8 sourses menu, starting cooking you rice but the customer is slow eater and enjoys food and wine and buzz. Is seatinglonger, your rice bocomes cooked. But the customer aint ready? You chill it, and then whats the difference between the one cooked few hours before?

    Maybe "maybe" its possible In places where you would like to spend half an hour waiting for it, then in the middle of you enjoying your foccacia/herbs/drinks risotto arrives just the second its cooked perfectly. But if it arrives when your in toilet, gets overcooked and what then?
    All the fuss for nothing, not mentioning how much would that portion cost, huh, if you have one chef for one portion for one section?

    When I worked in Trattoria every pizza and lasagne would be assembled and dough for pizza rolled a la minute. Even in the heaviest rush. I think Id rather wait for pizza, but it aint risotto, which can easily get gluey...

  2. #12
    Senior Member hambone.johnson's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by bieniek View Post
    Lets straighten risotto thing out. I dont think it is possible to cook it totally to order. Lets say you have 8 sourses menu, starting cooking you rice but the customer is slow eater and enjoys food and wine and buzz. Is seatinglonger, your rice bocomes cooked. But the customer aint ready? You chill it, and then whats the difference between the one cooked few hours before?

    Maybe "maybe" its possible In places where you would like to spend half an hour waiting for it, then in the middle of you enjoying your foccacia/herbs/drinks risotto arrives just the second its cooked perfectly. But if it arrives when your in toilet, gets overcooked and what then?
    All the fuss for nothing, not mentioning how much would that portion cost, huh, if you have one chef for one portion for one section?

    When I worked in Trattoria every pizza and lasagne would be assembled and dough for pizza rolled a la minute. Even in the heaviest rush. I think Id rather wait for pizza, but it aint risotto, which can easily get gluey...
    I have read about and know cooks who have worked at places, usually nationally recognized big names and the rissotto is cook litterally to order. its pre-weighed and the onions and garlic are mised out ahead of time and it is done in service per order, they say it sucks and its very challenging, but these are people working in micheline starred restaurants and thats how the chef wants it. easiest written report of this is the newer eddition of "kitchen confidential"(released with some extra writings in the back) when Tony describes the restaurant next to his in NYC and the quality of service they do there, they make it from scratch, and his writing is reflective of how absurd and rare it is. i have worked with cooks who worked in NY at some of the french Micheline starred restaurants and they say the same thing, it sucks, but its what your ordered to do. i've never personally done it.

    You are correct with the pizza thing. and in my previous post i was using a flatbread pizza at a wine bar as an example. not a "real" pizza dough at a propper pizza joint where you have a multitude of options and toppings and what not. i was thinking of a place that might have one flatbread as an option on a menu as an app or small plate and they dont have any options for topping, just that one pizza.

  3. #13
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  4. #14
    Here is my take on it: If someone orders a risitto, he or she should know that it takes about 18-25 minutes to be cooked. So, they should expect as such. The staff should tell them if there is a delay or anything or maybe a reminder to pre-order them.

    I think you can precook onions/garlic other sides for risotto, but it has to be cooked to order.

  5. #15
    Senior Member ThEoRy's Avatar
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    Arborio rice is par cooked for about 18 minutes then laid out on a sheet pan to cool quickly in the fridge and later finished off to order.

    Sometimes we do pan sauces a la minute but for the most part reductions, beurre blanc etc are made pre shift. It's not on the menu but we get Bearnaise requests and it is made a la minute upon request. That's always fun when you're in the weeds.

    I'm the king of all mayo at my place! If we ever run out for whatever reason people start freaking out. I relish the opportunity to step in and bust out a fresh batch in the robot coupe in about a minute. It's strange to me that people are amazed that you can make mayonnaise. "You can make mayo?!" I'm like "Taste it." The response is always, "Wow that's even better than Hellmann's" lol
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  6. #16
    Yes I love making fresh mayo in small batches with my immersion blender (for home use). Very fun to whip it up IMO.

    However I have trouble getting mine to the consistancy of Hellman's. If I put it in the fridge, the next day it is more like hellman's, however the first day is more liquidy.

    What ratio do you use for mayo?

  7. #17
    Quote Originally Posted by ThEoRy View Post
    Arborio rice is par cooked for about 18 minutes then laid out on a sheet pan to cool quickly in the fridge and later finished off to order.

    Sometimes we do pan sauces a la minute but for the most part reductions, beurre blanc etc are made pre shift. It's not on the menu but we get Bearnaise requests and it is made a la minute upon request. That's always fun when you're in the weeds.

    I'm the king of all mayo at my place! If we ever run out for whatever reason people start freaking out. I relish the opportunity to step in and bust out a fresh batch in the robot coupe in about a minute. It's strange to me that people are amazed that you can make mayonnaise. "You can make mayo?!" I'm like "Taste it." The response is always, "Wow that's even better than Hellmann's" lol
    What's the most pain in the ass thing you have to do for a pickup?

  8. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by ptolemy View Post
    Here is my take on it: If someone orders a risitto, he or she should know that it takes about 18-25 minutes to be cooked. So, they should expect as such. The staff should tell them if there is a delay or anything or maybe a reminder to pre-order them.

    I think you can precook onions/garlic other sides for risotto, but it has to be cooked to order.

    Well here's what I'm wondering... how quickly do people expect their dinner? I'm 26 and tend to blow what little extra income I have on toys and beer so I rarely get to eat at anything closely resembling a nice restaraunt. However, when I do go out to a nice place, I want to enjoy the company I'm with, have a couple drinks and relax. I don't want to rush in and out. I don't expect my meal to be ready in under 20 minutes. Do people really think 25 minutes is too long?

  9. #19
    Senior Member ThEoRy's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by slowtyper View Post
    Yes I love making fresh mayo in small batches with my immersion blender (for home use). Very fun to whip it up IMO.

    However I have trouble getting mine to the consistancy of Hellman's. If I put it in the fridge, the next day it is more like hellman's, however the first day is more liquidy.

    What ratio do you use for mayo?
    You have to remember you are most likely using warm oil to make it and the friction from the spinning blades also heats it up as well. Of course the next day after refrigeration it will be thicker from having been chilled. I always keep that in mind. Ratio? I just eyeball it. If it's too thin add more oil. Going off my hollandaise recipe I guess I can put about 1 lb of butter/fat per yolk but I don't know if that translates to mayo recipes. The yolks in hollandaise are fluffed up over triple their size before I stream in the butter.

    I start in the robot coupe with the yolks and water then whiz em up and stream in the oil. After I get the mayo/aioli the proper thickness I like to add acid in the form of lemon juice or white distilled vinegar, then I season with kosher salt, fresh white pepper and a tap of cayenne.
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  10. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by ThEoRy View Post
    You have to remember you are most likely using warm oil to make it and the friction from the spinning blades also heats it up as well. Of course the next day after refrigeration it will be thicker from having been chilled. I always keep that in mind. Ratio? I just eyeball it. If it's too thin add more oil. Going off my hollandaise recipe I guess I can put about 1 lb of butter/fat per yolk but I don't know if that translates to mayo recipes. The yolks in hollandaise are fluffed up over triple their size before I stream in the butter.

    I start in the robot coupe with the yolks and water then whiz em up and stream in the oil. After I get the mayo/aioli the proper thickness I like to add acid in the form of lemon juice or white distilled vinegar, then I season with kosher salt, fresh white pepper and a tap of cayenne.
    Whole or clarified butter?

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