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Thread: How do restaurants make _______ to order?

  1. #21
    Senior Member tkern's Avatar
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    To interject: its all preference. I prefer clarified but some (salty and I had a brief conversation about this) like whole butter.

    And regardless of what thomas keller says, put your acid and mustard at the beginning of your aioli, not the end.

  2. #22
    Senior Member ThEoRy's Avatar
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    I use clarified in the hollandaise.

    And yes, for mayo I sometimes start with the acid and the yolks together then stream in the oil. Trouble is sometimes you don't want to start with too much acid as it's harder to adjust later without losing product or making too much.
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  3. #23
    Quote Originally Posted by tkern View Post
    To interject: its all preference. I prefer clarified but some (salty and I had a brief conversation about this) like whole butter.

    And regardless of what thomas keller says, put your acid and mustard at the beginning of your aioli, not the end.
    Why is this? the acid part?

    BTW you can make risotto in like 4 min if you pressure cook it, I don't know of any restaurant that does it nor have I tried it but the Ideas in food blog team has done it and the results are good according to them.

  4. #24
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    I just spoke with a friend, originally from Umbria, who owns and runs a fairly large five-star hotel and banquet hall on the outskirts of town and he says they only make risotto to order, from scratch. Even when it's a set course in the banquet hall with 300 guests, it's made from scratch an cooked start to finish. A la carte they have five or six different risotti on the menu, and rotate through about a dozen variations. He gave me some good ideas to try (pear & taleggio, asparagus and potato, strawberry & brie and a few others). He says they most often use Prosecco instead of white wine, and vegetable broth in about 2/3 of them because of the more delicate flavors and aromas.
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  5. #25
    Another thing I've wondered is how restaurants deal with tomatoes.

    When I buy tomatoes for my home (just regular store bought tomatoes) I leave them out on the counter for a few days and then eat them, as I've always been told not to store them in the fridge or they lose a lot of flavour.

    This is all fine and dandy for me, because I don't eat tomatoes often, but if I ate them every single day it would be hard to manage (buying them very frequently to have them ready to eat daily, buying too much if I skip a week of eating them, etc etc).

    Lets say the restaurant serves them raw in a salad. How do they deal with buying and storage?

  6. #26
    I can easily believe there are some twisted chefs in french starred restaurant, if instead of french cuisine they serve risotto. Saying that Im aware that these days everything goes.

    Slowtyper, there are places wher eyou have 3 positions on the menu using beans, yet you are only allowed to order in grams for your next day. And its not cause of lack of fridge space.

    I wonder, I always thrown thyme to risotto when it was literally 30 seconds away from going into be spreaded onto tray, cause I believe the thyme flavour gets overcooked and dead after too long cooking, yet its better for the rice to cool down first....

    But I have to cook one for myself the other way and taste.

  7. #27
    Quote Originally Posted by memorael View Post
    Why is this? the acid part?

    BTW you can make risotto in like 4 min if you pressure cook it, I don't know of any restaurant that does it nor have I tried it but the Ideas in food blog team has done it and the results are good according to them.
    The acid should kill any nasties in the raw egg, but I'm not sure how well it would work after you add all the oil. The risk is pretty minimal to begin with though, especially if you're using good eggs which you really ought to be if you're making mayo from scratch. Also, a little lemon/lime juice tastes good.

    Why water though? I've made quite a bit of mayo and I've never put any water in.

    And I make mine by hand. With a whisk. One drop at a time. This is something that would definitely not work to order in a restaurant

  8. #28
    Senior Member NO ChoP!'s Avatar
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    You cannot make risotto properly in a pressure cooker. It takes constant stirring to bring out the creaminess.
    I worked at a top rated restaurant that was known for its risotto; we cooked every order singularly and to order. The saute station did it, while also doing pasta dishes. A wooden spoon and stainless pot were key...

    As far as NATO or imulsified vinaigrettes, a good chef should be able to knock a batch out in literally one minute, consistantly.
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  9. #29
    Senior Member NO ChoP!'s Avatar
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    Mayo, not NATO...damn auto correct...
    The difference between try and triumph is a little "umph"! NO EXCUSES!!!!!!!
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  10. #30

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    Quote Originally Posted by slowtyper View Post
    Another thing I've wondered is how restaurants deal with tomatoes.

    When I buy tomatoes for my home (just regular store bought tomatoes) I leave them out on the counter for a few days and then eat them, as I've always been told not to store them in the fridge or they lose a lot of flavour.

    This is all fine and dandy for me, because I don't eat tomatoes often, but if I ate them every single day it would be hard to manage (buying them very frequently to have them ready to eat daily, buying too much if I skip a week of eating them, etc etc).

    Lets say the restaurant serves them raw in a salad. How do they deal with buying and storage?
    We keep a case of tomatoes in the walk in. Can't speak for finer establishments.

    -AJ

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