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Thread: Employment Problems

  1. #41
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    David, I would suggest reaching out to your local & regional woodworking clubs. You will be able to find some excellent, hardworking craftsmen. Between the people in the club and their friends who are at least decent woodworkers, there must be at least a small number of people who are close looking for work (even retired guys looking for sometime to fill part of their days).

    If you do contract with a local cabinet or wordworking shop to provide you intermediate or final product, you'll want to make sure you have a clad contract that they cannot sell similar products to yours, particularly if you need to train them on the methods you've perfected to make your product one of the best.

    Good luck!

  2. #42
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    In economics there is this concept called 'adverse selection'. Essentially in the job market this means that good workers are actually working and employers will pay to retain them. So if you are a good worker you should (in theory) be working and all those people who are unemployed and applying are actually 'lemons'. Unfortunately, once you enter the unemployed ranks, you are 'marked' as a lemon even if that isn't the case. It is the same reason there is a much higher proportion of lemon cars in the used car market than should normally occur in the general 'car' population.

    And it is the same thing that happens when you offer a great health care plan at work. The adverse selection process means that sick workers or people who have ill family members tend to apply more. So by offering a great health plan, you might actually have a bad result and have more sick days taken by workers. So if you have a good health plan and hire someone who is unemployed, you are more likely to get a sickly bad worker. Of course this doesn't always or often happen, but it can.

    So the key is to hire someone who is already working at another job, but in tight job markets this means you are going to have to pay more.

    k.
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  3. #43
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    Quote Originally Posted by mr drinky View Post
    So the key is to hire someone who is already working at another job...
    I remember when I was looking for a job down in this area, often as not the first question I would be asked was "Are you currently employed?" I don't know if anyone had the balls to come out and say it, but I got the definite feeling that certain companies were not interested in anyone that was currently unemployed. In a few months I'll get to see if that's changed at all since we'll be moving up to NYC area.

  4. #44
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    For years I used to think it was difficult to find a good boss. When I became one it became difficult to find a good employee.

    Finding people who take pride in what they do and who follow the simple Golden Rule is not easy. When I hire my grown kids to help out I expect the same from them as anyone else. They're out of the house and I'm tapping the 16 year-old boy across the street who has a phenomenal work ethic. I've watched him for years and his dad is the same way. Wish there were more out there like him.
    "Too much of anything is bad, but too much good whiskey is barely enough." —Mark Twain

  5. #45
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    I did hire a young man on Saturday for part-time work. Can't read a tape measure, hasn't worked in a wood shop, was going to UNC Charlotte but came back for financial reasons, is attending Guilford Technical Institute with the hopes of transferring to UNC Greensboro. He is a complete novice so I can train him as I want to and he was recommended by another young man who works at the shop that does my preliminary sanding on a 37" wide belt sander. I believe he will work out. Starts on Tuesday since I will be having cortisone injections in my back on Monday.

  6. #46
    Senior Member Chifunda's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by The BoardSMITH View Post
    I did hire a young man on Saturday for part-time work. Can't read a tape measure, hasn't worked in a wood shop, was going to UNC Charlotte but came back for financial reasons, is attending Guilford Technical Institute with the hopes of transferring to UNC Greensboro. He is a complete novice so I can train him as I want to and he was recommended by another young man who works at the shop that does my preliminary sanding on a 37" wide belt sander. I believe he will work out. Starts on Tuesday since I will be having cortisone injections in my back on Monday.
    Good luck with the cortisone injections. They helped my back quite a bit.

  7. #47
    Senior Member Deckhand's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by The BoardSMITH View Post
    I did hire a young man on Saturday for part-time work. Can't read a tape measure, hasn't worked in a wood shop, was going to UNC Charlotte but came back for financial reasons, is attending Guilford Technical Institute with the hopes of transferring to UNC Greensboro. He is a complete novice so I can train him as I want to and he was recommended by another young man who works at the shop that does my preliminary sanding on a 37" wide belt sander. I believe he will work out. Starts on Tuesday since I will be having cortisone injections in my back on Monday.
    Hope you feel better, and your helper works out.

  8. #48

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    Quote Originally Posted by The BoardSMITH View Post
    I did hire a young man on Saturday for part-time work. Can't read a tape measure, hasn't worked in a wood shop, was going to UNC Charlotte but came back for financial reasons, is attending Guilford Technical Institute with the hopes of transferring to UNC Greensboro. He is a complete novice so I can train him as I want to and he was recommended by another young man who works at the shop that does my preliminary sanding on a 37" wide belt sander. I believe he will work out. Starts on Tuesday since I will be having cortisone injections in my back on Monday.
    Sometimes its better to get to newbies. Then you can train them any way you want without having to break bad habits first. It can take a little longer, but wil be rewarding in the end.

  9. #49

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    Quote Originally Posted by The BoardSMITH View Post
    I did hire a young man on Saturday for part-time work.


    Good to hear you got something worked out.

    What might be worthwhile is seeking out older, retired folks who've either been cabinet makers/carpenters or have taken up the hobby since retiring.

    Tell them what you need, give them a time frame how much you'll give them per board or whatever. Make sure it's an honest, fair rate but not so much work that it's going to be a full time job for them. If there's a particular way you want the boards made, explain that and make sure they stick to it.

    They do something like that here, except it's officially organized. You'll see what they call the 'silver service' doing yard work, general laboring or whatever. I think they factor in you get a % of an able bodied worker, and you pay accordingly. It keeps the older folks busy and gives them some pocket money and they can work as often as they want. You can't contract them for proper, permanent work, but if you've got to load or unload a shipping container, clean up a yard, general unskilled work, then they're ideal.

    And if they're older, retired folks and you have a few of them it'd not be something you need to sort out when you need the help (and are possibly unable to find the time or the person to plug the hole), and it would be instant help when you need it, but only when you need it.

    Me, I got help coming in a week and a half. We shall see if she works out or not.

    (But she'll be very, very distracting and a bit of a slave driver I think...)

    Stu.

  10. #50
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    Quote Originally Posted by ThEoRy View Post
    Tell me about it. I'm looking for a grill cook now and after wading through all the jokers I finally find an applicant I feel is worth an interview and he no shows on me today! Go figure. You need work. I may offer you a position. WHA HAPPEN YOU GUY!!
    If I was in NY/NJ I would take it, I would love to work with you.

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