Quantcast
Lucky Peach #3 - Page 7
Page 7 of 8 FirstFirst ... 5678 LastLast
Results 61 to 70 of 78

Thread: Lucky Peach #3

  1. #61
    Senior Member Mitbud's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Location
    Grand Rapids, MI
    Posts
    195

    Bourdane

    Quote Originally Posted by slowtyper View Post
    I think any chef in a position where people will listen to them owes everybody the favour of trying to push them away from joining this career choice. Much like Bourdain did in his famous book.
    I was just thinking that shankster writes with a very similar voice to Bourdane.

  2. #62
    Senior Member Crothcipt's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Location
    wyoming, closer to nowhere than somewhere.
    Posts
    3,494
    welcome mitbud. I just picked up this issue yesterday. I was surprised it was even here. I have only read a few articles, and am liking most of what I am reading.

  3. #63
    Senior Member shankster's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    Toronto/Canada
    Posts
    506
    Quote Originally Posted by Mitbud View Post
    I was just thinking that shankster writes with a very similar voice to Bourdane.
    I'll take that as a compliment....I think :-D

  4. #64
    Senior Member
    Chef Niloc's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Location
    Long island NY
    Posts
    1,034
    1am I'm out early tonight!!! Only a 16 hr work day!!! Going to sleep got to get up for work in 5 hours ..

  5. #65
    Senior Member JKerr's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Location
    Melbourne
    Posts
    366
    Question: Do you need to go to culinary school and study full time to get qualified in America? Or do you have a subsidised "apprenticeship" type programme?

    For example, in Australia you can study full time for a year, which I think is roughly $10k depending where you go, for a Cert III in commercial cookery (and the impression I've got so far is that most head chefs are dubious of anyone who's gone down that road). Alternatively you can sign up as an apprentice with an employer, work with them full time and do 1 day a week at school over 3 years, the cost is subsidised by the Australian government and on a sliding scale depending on a factor of things; this is what I'm doing now and the cost is roughly $600 a year, so $1800 all up. The only down side is the pay is **** (by Australian standards).

  6. #66
    Senior Member shankster's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    Toronto/Canada
    Posts
    506
    Ah..the glamorous life of a Chef..long hours,little sleep and back at it the next day..Who wouldn't want to do this for a living??

  7. #67
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2011
    Location
    Singapore
    Posts
    750
    Quote Originally Posted by JKerr View Post
    Question: Do you need to go to culinary school and study full time to get qualified in America? Or do you have a subsidised "apprenticeship" type programme?

    For example, in Australia you can study full time for a year, which I think is roughly $10k depending where you go, for a Cert III in commercial cookery (and the impression I've got so far is that most head chefs are dubious of anyone who's gone down that road). Alternatively you can sign up as an apprentice with an employer, work with them full time and do 1 day a week at school over 3 years, the cost is subsidised by the Australian government and on a sliding scale depending on a factor of things; this is what I'm doing now and the cost is roughly $600 a year, so $1800 all up. The only down side is the pay is **** (by Australian standards).
    I'm going the opposite route from you by choosing to go for a cert IV and a degree. For me it's 80% for the management side of things that I'm going to school for. Alot of the kids around me have no interest in what they are doing and generally don't give a ****. I go to school 3 days a week, paid work for 2 days, volunteer for 1 day and still manage to finish my assignments, show up for school on time, with a clean and pressed uniform. Some people are complaining that they do not have time even when they don't work or volunteer.. They take it for granted that once you get the cert, you will get a job, which IMHO is bull..

    Ok rant over.. Sorry for that :P

  8. #68

    knyfeknerd's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Location
    Charlotte, NC AKA The Queen City! The lint-filled belly button of the south.
    Posts
    2,725
    This magazine is great. Should you go to culinary school? Sure, enjoy paying off those student loans while making $8.50 an hour.
    The fact that you went to school for 2 years does not make you a chef. Don't argue with me and tell me "Master Chef insructor ToqueTron taught me to do it this way, so this is how I'm gonna do it!" NO! you are going to do it the way I told you to because you work for me. Now shut up and go roll some phyllos!!!
    The little bit of knowledge that a lot of culinary schools teach can be a dangerous thing. It's just enough to make you think you know what you're doing.
    School can't make you care. School doesn't teach work ethic.
    They should have couses like: Culinary Alcoholism-Your Liver and You
    The humpback chef
    Chafed Balls
    I wish I had a life, etc. etc. etc.
    This life is NOT glamorous. The pay sucks. Run away. Don't go to school. Mom and dad would be more proud if you went to Clown College.
    Still, at the end of the day, I love what I do.
    I may not love my job.
    But I love what I do.

  9. #69
    Senior Member JKerr's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Location
    Melbourne
    Posts
    366
    I don't think there's anything wrong with going down the full-time study route, especially so for management purposes; I'll probably look into it myself once I've been in the industry for longer. I'd be confident in saying that most employers are looking for a work ethic first and everything else second; so if you've got it, you're sorted. But like you said, unfortunately there are a lot of folk who just want the cert so they can get a job which pays and it doesn't quite work out the way they expect. You've obviously got the work ethic and getting the experience as well as studying, but I'm sure you'd agree there's a lot of folk out there expecting to get their 40-45k salary straight out of 1 years study for their cert III before they've even had to scrub dishes for a night.

    Having said all that, I can't really complain. I think the industry in general is broken on a global scale by what's considered "the norm", but all things considered, it's still pretty ***** good in Australia. When I read posts or articles from chefs and students in America (and probably anywhere else for that fact) it sounds a lot harder than it is here. Hats off to all you

  10. #70
    Senior Member Crothcipt's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Location
    wyoming, closer to nowhere than somewhere.
    Posts
    3,494
    I never went to school for cooking. I got a job at Denny's as a line cook. I knew sh@# about cooking on the line. The gm liked my attitude, then off I went. The biggest break I got was after working at a few restaurants I worked under a chef that encouraged learning and he had ton's of cook books that explained what technique should be use when. Not to long after I was given a talk to about cooking better than my co workers. I at that time had no idea what he meant by it. Had to learn then that not everyone wants to put out the best dish, just make the slop. I have worked with more stoodents than with good ones that want to learn. Most show up with a attitude of I am better than you, when they have no idea what the are doing.

    My point is that it doesn't matter were you get the education it's what you do with it. If you are still learning even after you leave the "Institutes" you will be very good at what you do. Oh ya learn to be quick and fast too.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •