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Thread: New knife arrived - should I take to the stone?

  1. #1
    Senior Member Shinob1's Avatar
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    New knife arrived - should I take to the stone?

    My Yoshihiro 210mm Gyuto arrived! I'm stoked, but the level of sharpness isn't where I hoped it would be. Should I use it for a bit first or just take it to the stone? Keep in mind that I have never freehand sharpened, I'm concerned I'll ruin the edge that's already on there.

    Here are some pics. http://imgur.com/a/HXLao

  2. #2
    Senior Member K-Fed's Avatar
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    If you were planning on using this knife to learn sharpening on anyway and have a useable knife to use in the meantime should the freehand sharpening not go so well during the learning process I would say go for it. Also, if you haven't watched any of dave's or c-dawg's or Jon's sharpening videos I would highly recommend it. Im pretty confident in my sharpening abilities and still watch the videos from time to time. Always learn something new, or a new perspective, or get a better grasp how to get what I want out of my edges. Anyway enough rambling... and good luck =)

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    well i dont know ya nor what you consider sharp nor what stones you use so a lot unknown to me making this suggestion but there is only one way to learn to sharpen and it requires that you sharpen the knife.

    ruin it is a funny concept mostly you can make it more time consuming to fix. if you take your time and dont push too hard odds are even if it doesnt look pretty it will still be sharp or sharper. anyway i dont think it will take you long to learn. sending it to someone like dave is nice because he can set the edge for you and then you can try to learn to maintain it til you realize your limits and then send it back to someone like him again. nice thing about dave you can try to sharpen it before you send it to him and most likely he will give you feedback. erven if dave is too far from you hopefully there are some other freehand sharpeners around because the feedback is so important and thats why these forums are so valuable beyond just the posts.

    anyway goodluck im sure many more will chime in.

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  5. #5
    Senior Member Shinob1's Avatar
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    I have watched all of Jon's videos on sharpening along with Murray Carter, Salty Dog, the chef knifes to go videos and other random vids, but paid the most attention to Jon's videos. The knife is usable, but I think that the Global I bought was sharper out of the box.

    I definitely plan on using this knife to learn freehand sharpening. I may give it a go on another knife first. Like you said I could send it to Dave to get some feedback and a good edge put on it.

  6. #6
    Senior Member zitangy's Avatar
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    I do it with all new knives..

    do realize that the knife is sharp but may not be uber sharp.

    I would not commence with anything lower than 3,000 grit stone and move on to higher grits. Slowly taking time to lightly grind and getting to know the knife ( profile and steel). I also tend to create alot of slurry for this kind of sharpening adn keeping it moist at the kind of " texture that I prefer. ( the drier it is the more abrasive it is) A spray bottle gives me better control as to the amt of water that i add each time.

    I tend to use long strokes and generally lighter strokes so as to keep the profile and have a feel of it across the stone.

    have fun

    rgds
    d

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  8. #8
    From the J knives I have, most come only partially sharpened. They are sharp, but no where near what they can be! Sharpen away I say!

  9. #9
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    I say use it a few times then sharpen it, this way you can appreciate the significant increase in sharpness.

  10. #10
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    When I first get a knife, I like to use it a few times, before sharpening. It sets a bench mark on performance and sharpness. If an odd behavior occurs after I sharpen the knife, then I know its my fault.

    I think there is a built reluctance for most us to sharpen. Generally articles on sharpening come to the conclusion that its better to send out your knifes, then to sharpen them yourselves. How many threads have we seen, where a new sharpener asks, why is my knife in a funny shape? Both put me off sharpening for a long time.

    No matter whose system you use, the principles are the same raise a burr, reduce the burr, remove the burr.

    The best advice I've heard for a new sharpener is to get a 1000-2000 grit stone, and practice raising and reducing a burr.

    While the videos can offer a lot of insight into how to sharpen, its important to note that they are sharpening at speeds that only come with experience. As a new sharpener or experienced sharpener, its more important to be accurate then fast.

    When I saw Jon Broida's videos on how to sharpen, I realized that I would have to learn it, if I ever picked up a single bevel knife. I spent some time just holding a knife in the different grips, until it started to feel comfortable.

    The sharpie is probably the most valuable tool in learning how to sharpen. I'll run a sharpie two or three times, across the edge, when I sharpen. I'm thinking that I should run a sharpie more often, especially when doing tips.

    Check, double check, and keep on checking your work. It's easier correct a mistake early on, then having to deal with high and low spots.

    I screw things up, usually when I am frustrated. So at the first hints of frustration, I put the knife down and go do something else for a few minutes. I'll come back and try again. If I am still feeling frustrated, I'll put everything away, and sharpen on another day.

    Jay

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