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Thread: Is this the best Santoku knife?

  1. #101
    My most used knife in the kitchen now i Santoku, Nakiri and Petty. I have plenty of big knives but it seems to me just easier to reach for smaller knife.

  2. #102
    Sounds like you're not a pro Maxim ... small knifes ... wait, I just ordered a 18 cm santoku myself - damn I guess I fall into your category too

  3. #103
    Hello Theory.

    Can you provide any good academic citations that support your theory?

    Thanks

    Quote Originally Posted by ThEoRy View Post
    Kind of, but there's more to the story.

    It was originally marketed towards young Japanese housewives around 1930s-1950ish when western food started becoming popular in Japan as the hip new western knife that was capable of handling meat, fish and veggies. Therefore three virtues. "Hey ladies, wanna be hip and cool and eat like like westerners? Then you need this new knife. You don't need specialized knives like deba, yanagiba and usuba anymore when this one knife does it all!!"

    So there's actually 3 sets of "three virtues". Slice, dice, mince. Meat, fish, veg. And Deba, yanagi, usuba. This ************* knife has 9 ************* virtues yall! Buy this **** now!

    What do I see there? Marketing talk. Nothing more. And now we've come full circle here in the West. "Wanna have cool Japanese knives ladies? You need a santoku!" That's where I see a lot of the disdain towards this knife coming from as well. The marketing backlash.

    All that being said, I have two santoku. Do I take them to work in my kit and use them? No.

  4. #104
    Senior Member chinacats's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by gadgetguy9000 View Post
    Hello Theory.

    Can you provide any good academic citations that support your theory?

    Thanks
    Dude, this is the internet...what's your theory?

    Oh, and the Furi Rachael Ray 7" Edgy Santoku Knife is definitely the best santoku knife out there.
    once in a while you get shown the light, in the strangest of places if you look at it right

  5. #105
    Senior Member ThEoRy's Avatar
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    i AM the academic citation.
    Starting this harvest I'm a starving startling artist/
    Lyrical arsonist it's arduous spitting this smartest arsenic/

  6. #106
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    Quote Originally Posted by ThEoRy View Post
    i AM the academic citation.
    I endorse this statement.

  7. #107
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    That JNS is a great looking Santoku. Jon's site JKI has some nice Santoku's. The Gesshin Uraku has a high thin behind the edge grind good blade for the price. A-Frames is another site for quality blades.

    Can't say much as it's 11 pages long already lengthy. Just make a couple points, the Santoku design is a shorter version of more traditional Japanese cutters longer in length which are flatter & more drop nosed than western style . The Santoku is a hugely successful knife design. Not just because so many have been sold from crap to finest steels & grinds, most knife makers both Japanese & now even European have a few in their lineup. No matter if you are polarized how you feel about them, cannot argue their success.

    To me a bad design is all those full heel bolsters, some very thick on western chef's knives. Makes heel sharpening impossible, over time screwing up the shape of the blade. I cannot believe they still make them soft steel, thick behind the edge, misguided tradition.

    I just do not buy that the Santoku is a bad design. I can do certain types of tip work with a Santoku or Cleaver, Watch a skilled Chinese chef use the tip on a cleaver. There are certain prep jobs where a gyuto or petty works better. I would agree that a gyuto is a best all around blade. Putting out banquet's close to 40 years, almost 30 years totally hooked on Japanese knives Gyuto's, Sugi's & Yanagiba's. Never used a Santoku at work not because didn't like them didn't feel need for one. Did have a longer flatter Japanese carbon gyuto with more drop at the tip than most gyuto's loved that knife for massive amounts of prep work.

    Now I am a old fart home cook have & use a Santoku.

  8. #108
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    Quote Originally Posted by keithsaltydog View Post
    That JNS is a great looking Santoku. Jon's site JKI has some nice Santoku's. The Gesshin Uraku has a high thin behind the edge grind good blade for the price. A-Frames is another site for quality blades.

    Can't say much as it's 11 pages long already lengthy. Just make a couple points, the Santoku design is a shorter version of more traditional Japanese cutters longer in length which are flatter & more drop nosed than western style . The Santoku is a hugely successful knife design. Not just because so many have been sold from crap to finest steels & grinds, most knife makers both Japanese & now even European have a few in their lineup. No matter if you are polarized how you feel about them, cannot argue their success.

    To me a bad design is all those full heel bolsters, some very thick on western chef's knives. Makes heel sharpening impossible, over time screwing up the shape of the blade. I cannot believe they still make them soft steel, thick behind the edge, misguided tradition.

    I just do not buy that the Santoku is a bad design. I can do certain types of tip work with a Santoku or Cleaver, Watch a skilled Chinese chef use the tip on a cleaver. There are certain prep jobs where a gyuto or petty works better. I would agree that a gyuto is a best all around blade. Putting out banquet's close to 40 years, almost 30 years totally hooked on Japanese knives Gyuto's, Sugi's & Yanagiba's. Never used a Santoku at work not because didn't like them didn't feel need for one. Did have a longer flatter Japanese carbon gyuto with more drop at the tip than most gyuto's loved that knife for massive amounts of prep work.

    Now I am a old fart home cook have & use a Santoku.
    To me a better question would be a santoku vs shorty gyuto or funayuki as they are the direct competition

  9. #109
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    Like Funayuki blades too. Some have the flatter profile, more board contact for forward push cuts and chopping. A lot less mainstream than Santoku's . Used Cleavers at work too. Still have several home cleavers.

  10. #110
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    A funayuki is a smaller, lighter, thinner deba - i.e. single bevel.

    I can't help but think it's a term that been hijacked for marketing purposes, e.g. "funayuki gyuto", in the same manner that "kiritsuke" is increasingly (wrongly) used to describe a gyuto with a clipped tip.

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