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Thread: Asymmetry – The REAL DEAL

  1. #111
    Senior Member Benuser's Avatar
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    Glad to hear you've got good advice, Geo87. One point I would like to add: be sure to have a loose grip. In my country apprentices learn to have a "firm" grip with their Wόsthof, and if a knife behaves differently than they're used to, they tend to make that grip even firmer. Which leads to disasters with asymmetric blades that steer somewhat. But in general, balancing friction on both sides seems to work well, indeed.

  2. #112
    I was mentioned earlier that some knives can be switched from right to left at the edge only.
    I would assume that this is only possible for knives that are symmetrically ground, and only the edge is not symmetric. Is that a correct assumption ?

  3. #113
    Senior Member Benuser's Avatar
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    See in this same thread post nr 102 and further. It might work to some extend with very thin blades.

  4. #114
    Could someone kindly have a look at my knife and help me out? I don't know if it is me or if this knife is left-hand biased in its assymetry. I'm a righty who bought this cheap buho funayuki as a light prep knife but one day at work I felt the blade 'side-tracking' to the right, like a dog that pulls on your leash but ever-so-slightly. This was when I was cutting red cabbage and was about 60-70mm off the board at its highest point where the cut commenced.

    I know choil shots arent the most helpful when it comes to determining asymmetry or detecting irregularities in grinds but I figured it might be a place to start. Can someone share whether or not the grind is just another example of a lazy job and how i should go about treating it?



  5. #115
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    It does look like a left hand biased knife from choil shots. Raising bevel height on the left hand side might help.

  6. #116
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    Oops, I meant the other way around. Or explicitly convexing the right hand side, making it more like hamaguri/strong hamaguri edge.

  7. #117
    It's hard to say for certain, but it looks to me that knife in the picture two posts above is symmetric.

    I will try to explain asymmetry in a simple fashion. Visualize a line at the center of same thickness blank, say 3mm thick, so the line will be exactly at 1.5mm. You will get a symmetric knife if both sides are ground to that line. Now, move this line off center somewhat and grind to it. On one side you will have a larger convex radius than on the other (I assume that the knife is ground convex, not flat, though even flat grind will result in asymmetric grind). The larger convex side will be your cutting side.

    That is how you get asymmetry. The 60-40, 70-30, 90-10 are not asymmetry, it's the bevels that are cut into the edge. Imagine that you grind a knife symmetrically to say .5mm thickness at the edge, then cut a wide bevel on the right side and debur on the left. You get 90-10, but the knife is still symmetric, as far as the grind is concerned. These bevels are typically done to make sharpening easier and to make do have some minor advantage in cut initiation.

    Hope this helps.

    Marko


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  8. #118
    Senior Member Geo87's Avatar
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    Great explanation marko.

    Sherski: as far as my understanding goes... Your edge is like the rudder of a boat. It tells your knife where to go. If your knife pulls to one direction you need to adjust the location of the very edge. If it pulls right then cut a bigger bevel on the right. That will re centre your edge slightly and hopefully you'll be pointing strait. Keep making adjustments until your happy.

  9. #119
    Senior Member erikz's Avatar
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    I'm not a pro or an expert at all Sherski, but this is how I would analyze the blade:




    I would expect this knife to steer a bit as well...

  10. #120
    Senior Member Mucho Bocho's Avatar
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    Thanks for the illustration Erik. Very helpful
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