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Thread: Shinogi Line + Blended/Convex Bevel? (Gyutos)

  1. #1

    Shinogi Line + Blended/Convex Bevel? (Gyutos)

    I do like myself a convex or blended bevel, but I also looooove a clean shinogi line. From what I know, yanagi's have a clean shinogi as well as a slightly convex bevel, right?

    What are your thoughts on trying this with a gyuto? Is it already old news?

  2. #2
    I have never heard of this... Maybe if the shinogi line is pretty high on the blade there won't be any problems, or if the knife is thin enough. Probably best to just make a contrast using finger stones or something to give the illusion of a shinogi line.

  3. #3

  4. #4
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    Or to a lesser extent this: http://www.japaneseknifeimports.com/...chi-gyuto.html
    Obviously the main difference is that unlike a traditional knife with a shinogi line (Yanagiba, Usuba, Deba) you do it to both sides. Also the shinogi isn't as pronounced, if it was your knife would be far too thick.

  5. #5
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    Heiji, Zakuri, Yoshikane, Kochi and Carter utilize elements of this type of grind. I'm sure there are others but these are what come to mind.

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by tk59 View Post
    Heiji, Zakuri, Yoshikane, Kochi and Carter utilize elements of this type of grind. I'm sure there are others but these are what come to mind.
    Tinh, are any of the knives (other than Carter) concave below the 'shinogi' line?

  7. #7
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    All of them to some extent or another, but it's questionable whether this is by design or the product of the use of grinding wheels, as opposed to belts grinders. Carters (of which I've seen quite a few) are just about flat at some points and convex/concave at others, for example. When you're sharpening, you're not going to thin it concave so unless you plan on sending it back to the manufacturer, the concave part is temporary, imo.

    Watanabe is another one that grinds this way.

  8. #8
    I noticed that the ones I've found so far either: have a hammer or kurouchi finish, or their bevel only travels up about 1/3 of the blade height.





    I really, really like the look of this carter, as the line is higher on the blade.


    However, aside from the Heiji, which has a shorter bevel, I haven't found any that have a really distinct and sharp shinogi line. They look kind of wavy and washed.

    These are the kinds of grinds I really love, where the shinogi is halfway up the blade height, and they are prominent and cleeeean.




    I do realize that it's a difference between single and double bevel, and all sorts of factors including thicknesses, angles, finishes, bevel heights, etc.

  9. #9
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    If you want to do a gyuto with a shinogi line similar to one that is on a yanagiba or usuba the knife will be far too thick.

  10. #10
    Yeah, maybe I'm looking for a mythical entity that doesn't exist...

    Perhaps I try to grind a knife like this, though? Just as an idea, it's very exaggerated; the spine wont be sharp or anything, the idea is just to have a slight angle above the shinogi line. Hope I'm not being too confusing.



    Similarly to how some knives have false edges above the actual bevel, along the whole knife?

    I imagine there are probably performance issues with this, then =/

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