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Thread: WIP vintage knives

  1. #11
    Canada's Sharpest Lefty Lefty's Avatar
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    Yeah, take the bolster into the primary bevel (grind at the angle of sharpening, until it reduces the size of the bolster).
    09/06

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  2. #12
    Quote Originally Posted by slowtyper View Post
    I've got a few on the way also.


    One question to ask here... how to grind down the metal bolster so you can sharpen the blade evenly and easily?

    Ill grind it down for you if you want.

  3. #13
    Very generous offer Bishop but unless you are in Toronto I don't think it will be worth it to ship the knife around just for that.

    Thanks for the offer though, it is appreciated.

  4. #14
    Senior Member tkern's Avatar
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    Handle of the carver has been removed today during brunch using the most efficient tools found in the kitchen: an oyster knife, an eel spike, and a meat tenderizer. The pins are brass rivets. Does anyone know how to remove these without damaging them?

    Pictures of said knife, rusted to hell handle, and tools used will follow later.

  5. #15
    It's probably not worth the effort of annealing them and extracting them safely, but a propane torch will do the trick just fine. They need to be glowing red (ie when you take the flame off the brass, they should be visibly glowing red even in normal daylight) first, and then quenched in water. Then hammer one end of each pin down to a narrower cone and extract. You might want to anneal them again before putting on the new handle, just to be safe.
    I don't think that the annealing temperature for brass will do anything noteworthy to the tang of the knife, but I don't know much about steel.


    Note: Quenching brass does not harden it by any significant amount (unlike iron), and working it hot is a really bad idea - it will break.

    Note #2: Obviously, you only need to anneal the part of the pin you're gonna whack, so don't go overboard trying to make the whole thing glow.

    Note #3: Brass rod stock is available at most hardware stores at less than $10 for three FEET.

  6. #16
    Senior Member
    SpikeC's Avatar
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    If they are cutlery rivets they are not reusable. BTW, the optimum annealing temperature for brass is 1100º f.
    Spike C
    "The Buddha resides as comfortably in the circuits of a digital computer or the gears of a cycle transmission as he does at the top of a mountain."
    Pirsig

  7. #17
    Quote Originally Posted by SpikeC View Post
    ... BTW, the optimum annealing temperature for brass is 1100º f.
    Good to know, but I still think "it's glowing red even in daylight" is easier to measure for a cottage armourer like myself. :P

  8. #18

    knyfeknerd's Avatar
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    Are you going to shine the blade up? I'm a patina fan, but it might be cool to shine it up and start your own. It's very cool that these older knives get a new life.

  9. #19
    Senior Member tkern's Avatar
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    I'm going to leave the color on the carver. I was breaking down some pig ribs and loins a couple days ago and it took a nice blue sheen mixed with the old patina. The chef's knife I'm in the process of polishing, mainly because of all the rust and years of dirt corroding it.

  10. #20
    Senior Member tkern's Avatar
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    As for the annealing, I reiterate that the handle was taken off w/ an oyster knife, an eel spike, and a meat tenderizer. Blow torches in the 1000 degree range are a bit too high falutin for this operation.

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