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Thread: Profile Criticism

  1. #11
    Quote Originally Posted by WildBoar View Post
    Is this a 240? If so, blade height at heel is typically 50 mm +/- 2 mm. Not that it can't be less, but as stated it becomes more like a suji.

    What is this 'hammer grip' of which you speak?!? Pinch grip is more typical.
    You grip it like a hammer and smack things!

    I just figured that I should account for all sorts of uses, including ones that we may not favor so much
    Quote Originally Posted by ******* View Post
    For my first serious attempt, I just traced the profile of my Hattori FH and modified it for my own evil purposes. I didn't see the sense in trying to reinvent the wheel my first time out.
    Well, I would do that too, but I don't have such a thing as a nice knife yet

    All I have are some entry level Henckels and other various cheap knives, including Farberware. I haven't even touched a real Japanese knife yet, so I'm basing all of this design on what I read and see.

    Quote Originally Posted by JohnnyChance View Post
    He said knuckle clearance was 40mm, not that the heel height is 40mm. Heel height in the first post says 60mm, which is tall. Like was stated, 50mm is a typical ballpark for heel height on a gyuto. So you should still have plenty of knuckle clearance.

    I don't necessarily feel it is too flat or too pointy. How does it feel on the board?
    Since I'm not so experienced with any real cooking or any high-performing knife, it feels good to me



    Also, yes, overall height at the heel is currently at 60mm, so if I chop some off at the edge, it'll be within the norm and be at 50mm. For some reason I got confused when reading the forums and thought that the range "45mm-55mm" should be knuckle clearance, rather than overall height.

  2. #12
    Senior Member
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    Don, do not be shy about asking if someone is willing to send you a knife to study, measure, trace, etc. Even better, see if you can borrow 5-6 different ones (of a similar length) for comparison. There are a few KKF members in your area, so you may be able to look over a collection or two, and not even need to mess with UPS, USPS, etc.
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  3. #13

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    When I first came on board, a number of guys said that the standard relatively inexpensive Sabatier knives have a pretty good profile to work from.

  4. #14
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    i like it, but i favour flattish knives. My concern is mainly that i do not like the tall end of the tang. Seems to be unneccesary and takes away some from the nimbleness that the blade projects.

  5. #15
    Quote Originally Posted by ******* View Post
    When I first came on board, a number of guys said that the standard relatively inexpensive Sabatier knives have a pretty good profile to work from.
    The vintage ones. Excellent profiles.

  6. #16

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    Eamon, from what I have seen, the Elephant brand in carbon seems to be closer in shape to the originals. The not as common 9 inch chef in stainless from the brand that you see a lot on the web here in the US also looks more like the older ones to my eye than the 8 or 10 inches from the same firm. Their 8 incher looks a tad too "Germanic" IMO
    Quote Originally Posted by BurkeCutlery View Post
    The vintage ones. Excellent profiles.

  7. #17
    When I am looking at the edge and comparing it to the veneer wood seam on the table it does not seem all that flat to me.Sometimes getting to many opinions can do more harm then good,make a knife you like and have fun at it.

  8. #18
    Senior Member VoodooMajik's Avatar
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    I actually like the flatness. Personally I'd raise that tip up a notch, just a small, small amount of belly rocking. I can see myself using whats there with a slight mod pretty regularly. I also am no expert.

    Knuckle clearance be damned :P "Let Rod try! He's got small girly hands". Kidding..
    It's not the Answer it's the Experience

  9. #19
    Senior Member ThEoRy's Avatar
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    What you want is for it to look flat to the eye, but actually has a slight curve to it. This makes for a smoother cutting action without it feeling like it's slamming into the board with a sudden halt. Just one user's opinion but I feel pretty strongly about it.

    I want the knife to be an extension of my thoughts. A seamless transition from thought to action. I like my mind to be the tool, rhythmically guiding the steel. Any interruption in that thought process is a mental roadblock to me. Over time frustration builds until I find the knife is unusable.

    Basically, I don't want to think about the knife. It should disappear into my hand and become one with my thoughts. I like the feeling of zen I can achieve while working. A properly ground knife can make that much easier to attain.
    Starting this harvest I'm a starving startling artist/
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  10. #20
    Quote Originally Posted by ThEoRy View Post
    What you want is for it to look flat to the eye, but actually has a slight curve to it. This makes for a smoother cutting action without it feeling like it's slamming into the board with a sudden halt. Just one user's opinion but I feel pretty strongly about it.

    I want the knife to be an extension of my thoughts. A seamless transition from thought to action. I like my mind to be the tool, rhythmically guiding the steel. Any interruption in that thought process is a mental roadblock to me. Over time frustration builds until I find the knife is unusable.

    Basically, I don't want to think about the knife. It should disappear into my hand and become one with my thoughts. I like the feeling of zen I can achieve while working. A properly ground knife can make that much easier to attain.
    I get the idea, but I don't quite get it.

    To make the knife disappear, what elements should it have? How can I modify this profile to make it so it fits your description (seem straight but have a slight curve).

    I'm going to raise the tip up a smidgen for some belly and chop off 10mm from the bottom for now, and see how that works.

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