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Thread: Carborundom

  1. #1
    GoogleFu San steeley's Avatar
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    Carborundom

    [IMG][/IMG]It all began with a failed experiment.



    It was in 1890. In a small Pennsylvania town, the inventor Edward Goodrich Acheson carried out a series of experiments. He tried to heat carbon so intensely that it would result in diamond.



    It didn't work.



    So Acheson began mixing clay with carbon and electrically fusing it. The result was a product with shiny specks that were hard enough to scratch glass.



    This was silicon carbide. Also known as carborundum.



    The next year Acheson formed his company in Monongehela, PA and named it Carborundum, and moved the organization to Niagara Falls, NY in 1895.
    A clever cook can make good meat of a whetstone.” Erasmus

  2. #2
    GoogleFu San steeley's Avatar
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    [IMG][/IMG]
    A clever cook can make good meat of a whetstone.” Erasmus

  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by steeley;94981...
    It all began with a failed experiment...
    Cool. It's amazing how many significant discoveries are made serendipitously.

  4. #4
    GoogleFu San steeley's Avatar
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    [IMG][/IMG][IMG][/IMG]

    Top: cast iron stone holder.
    A clever cook can make good meat of a whetstone.” Erasmus

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    Senior Member Deckhand's Avatar
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    Illegitimi non carborundum.
    Great to see this history great post!

  6. #6
    SiC is an amazing material with some serious industrial uses.

    "Carborundum" is actually the initial trade name that SiC was originally patented (think Kleenex vs tissue). The Carborundum company now resides with Saint Gobain. They still make abrasives but other parts of the company make specialized parts for heat exchangers, furnaces, etc.

    So has anyone actaully sharpened with it?

  7. #7
    Senior Member Deckhand's Avatar
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    Interesting on the SIC. Never knew that. Makes great fishing rod guides.

  8. #8
    I believe my father had used a 4 sided 'stone' which looked identical to the one in the original post with the green handle--though his was significantly dished--is that only antique or are they still available today?

    Thanks, put a smile on my face seeing that picture,
    Cheers,
    Chinacats

  9. #9
    Steeley, I love you.

  10. #10
    GoogleFu San steeley's Avatar
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    well my girlfriend is not going to like this.
    A clever cook can make good meat of a whetstone.” Erasmus

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