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Thread: Cast Iron Cookware

  1. #101
    Senior Member DwarvenChef's Avatar
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    I think every piece of CI I have was first tested with bacon

  2. #102
    Senior Member DeepCSweede's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Shinob1 View Post
    I have a gas stove and the burners are fairly small - that's what I think part of my problem is. I think that when I put it on a lower temp the hot spot is worse since the flame is smaller, but I may not be giving it enough time. I'll try preheating on a very low setting and see how it goes.

    @Dwarven - are you buying the new lodge logic stuff at flea markets or the older lodge? I read that the older lodge CI had the polished cooking surface and therefore was similar to Griswold and Wagner. That's one of the main reasons I'm buying the Griswold, is for the smooth surface. And I think it will be nice to own a vintage piece of cookware that's older than me and my wife combined.
    They make cast iron diffusers for gas stoves which may help too. I have never used one but have heard good things about them. They only work on gas though

  3. #103
    Senior Member joec's Avatar
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    It is funny but a brand I've not seen in this thread is Wagner. Now I have several different CI pots and pans with some old and some new. My favorite cooking pan is a Wagner 12" fry pan period. It is a perfectly balance handle design so when lifting it there seems no urge to let it tilt. I've used the pan for years on gas, electric and the last year on induction and it has cooked better than my griswold or lodge pans. I also don't find smooth CI pans cook better than the later rough finished pans by Lodge and others. The one and only Wagner I can't explain other than to say it heats a bit faster, holds the heat a bit longer perhaps and is very comfortable to handle especially when hot. Other than that I notice little to know difference between the old Griswold, Wagners or Lodges and the new CI pans from Lodge and others with the rough finish. So in closing to me they all cook great and if properly seasoned they are non stick.
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    Joe

  4. #104
    Senior Member DwarvenChef's Avatar
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    I just panfried a few trout in my 10" lodge pan and never had a sticking problem. I love this stuff

    My wife just broke my Wagner grill pan Grrr but at least I got to get e new pan from the deal I hardly ever used it so I don't miss it much. My griddle is a Wagner and I think I have a corn bread pan that I will never give up lol.

    One thing I have been playing with has been the use of different oils in these pans. I stopped using canola oil due to health reasons, nasty stuff... And have moved to peanut, olive, walnut oils and good ol' Lard when I can find a good source that hasn't been hydrogenated... Lard by far is the best performing but is so rare these days. Peanut oil is a close second as far as seasoning ease and maintainance. Olive oil works great for cooking and all but I find it weak in the seasoning department, like it just doesnt want to get in there and stay. Anyone else notice that different fats act differently in your CI cookware?


  5. #105
    much more awesomer
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    Wait. Canola is unhealthy now?

    ETA: Ah. Nevermind. You read about it in yet another misleading chain email. Please add Snopes to your reference library. http://www.snopes.com/medical/toxins/canola.asp

    "This light, tasteless oil's popularity is due to the structure of its fats. It is lower in saturated fat (about 6%) than any other oil. Compare this to the high saturated fat content of peanut oil (about 18%) and palm oil (at an incredibly high 79%). It also contains more cholesterol-balancing monounsaturated fat than any oil except olive oil and has the distinction of containing Omega-3 fatty acids, a polyunsaturated fat reputed to not only lower both cholesterol and triglycerides, but also to contribute to brain growth and development.

    In other words, it's a healthy oil. One shouldn't feel afraid to use it because of some Internet scare loosely based on half-truths and outright lies."
    Francesco
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  6. #106

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    I have a Wagner and a Griswold that were my Grandmother's. At least I think it's a Wagner; it has a small 'W' cast on the bottom. Why did so many of the manufacturers not use casting marks!!! Grrrr. My mom gave them to me because she said they were worthless since they didn't have lids. I didn't even strip them. I just put a new coat of bacon grease on them and fired them outside on my gas grill. Both work like a charm. I probably use my various Lodges the most, followed by the Wagner and then the Griswold. I really can't tell much difference between them all. The Wagner and Griswold are smoother but the pebbly surface on my Lodges are so well seasoned that they work just as well. The Lodges might actually brown and sear better but that would be a tough call. I have both the earlier non-preseasoned and the preaseasoned Lodges and they look the same now. I did nothing special, just used them.

    Does anybody recognize this:




    The back says 10 1/2 INCH GRIDDLE MADE IN USA but no casting marks.



    This was my Dad's pancake griddle and has to be at a minimum 40 years old. You can kind of see the concentric tooling marks on the cooking surface. I rarely use this pan as it is an absolute PITA to control the heat on it. I think that's why my Dad wasn't shy about giving it to me.

    -AJ

  7. #107
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    Quote Originally Posted by DwarvenChef View Post
    I just panfried a few trout in my 10" lodge pan and never had a sticking problem. I love this stuff

    My wife just broke my Wagner grill pan Grrr but at least I got to get e new pan from the deal I hardly ever used it so I don't miss it much. My griddle is a Wagner and I think I have a corn bread pan that I will never give up lol.

    One thing I have been playing with has been the use of different oils in these pans. I stopped using canola oil due to health reasons, nasty stuff... And have moved to peanut, olive, walnut oils and good ol' Lard when I can find a good source that hasn't been hydrogenated... Lard by far is the best performing but is so rare these days. Peanut oil is a close second as far as seasoning ease and maintainance. Olive oil works great for cooking and all but I find it weak in the seasoning department, like it just doesnt want to get in there and stay. Anyone else notice that different fats act differently in your CI cookware?

    I agree with your observations on oil completely. I also dont use canola oil except when the health food store is out of spectrum high oleic sunflower or safflower oil. If I do buy canola oil, i always buy organic. Most of the canola grown in north america is GMO. Also, polyunsaturated fats, such as omega-3, break down at high temperatures. This is one reason flax seed oil makes a bad cooking oil. Saturated fats on the other hand and monounsaturated fats make better cooking oils. Long chain fatty acids are not directly absorbed into your blood like poly and mono unsaturated fats are. Stearic acid, which is the saturated fat found in butter and lard, is broken down into oleic acid, the mknounsaturated fat found in olive oil. It is believed that oleic acid is better for your arteries because it has a bend in its chain which prevents it from forming plac. Also, canola oil contains small amounts of erucic acid which is known to be harmful.

  8. #108
    Senior Member mpukas's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by obtuse View Post
    I agree with your observations on oil completely. I also dont use canola oil except when the health food store is out of spectrum high oleic sunflower or safflower oil. If I do buy canola oil, i always buy organic. Most of the canola grown in north america is GMO. Also, polyunsaturated fats, such as omega-3, break down at high temperatures. This is one reason flax seed oil makes a bad cooking oil. Saturated fats on the other hand and monounsaturated fats make better cooking oils. Long chain fatty acids are not directly absorbed into your blood like poly and mono unsaturated fats are. Stearic acid, which is the saturated fat found in butter and lard, is broken down into oleic acid, the mknounsaturated fat found in olive oil. It is believed that oleic acid is better for your arteries because it has a bend in its chain which prevents it from forming plac. Also, canola oil contains small amounts of erucic acid which is known to be harmful.
    Good posts f/ you and DW here. Canola is nasty stuff, but if you're gonna use it use organic, as in the US non-organic canola is GM. Canola oil is a farce - there are no "canola" plants - it's rape seed oil. It originated in Canada where they had a surpluss of it. The word "Canola" is a marketing by-product term of Canada-Oil. It was used primarily as a macherny lubricant before being marketed as a cooking oil. Rape seed is also know to be a toxic weed. Saying all that, I have found some information that states that what is now considered Canola oil has gone through a series of hybridizations (which is how almost all produce that we currently consume came to be) and is no longer considered toxic in it's most current form. I still won't use it.

    I find grape seed oil to be a good alternative. It's high heat and clean. But it's funky in that as it dries it gets really sticky and gummy. Haven't heard/read anything bad about it. Also, do a little investigating about safflower oil, or any refined oil suitable for high-heat use. Safflower can be GM and can have some adverse effects, and refining any oil can make it less beneficial for human consumption. Unless one has allergies/reactions, peanut oil is still one of the best "natural" high-heat oil.

    Re: seasoning cast iron, in the Jan/2011 issue of Cook's Illustrated (yeah, I get it...) there was a small article about seaosning w/ flax seed oil and how it can create an indestructible surface. Something about the type of fat that's in flax vs other oils. It involves several cycles of wiping the pan w/ flax oil, putting it in a very hot 500d oven for a time, and then turning the oven off and letting it cool, and repeat 4-5-6 times. I tried it w/ some new De Buyer carbon pans about a year ago, and it didn't work for me at all. It intially created a very black even finish but it immediately flaked off during the first cooking uses. Could be that it works for cast iron and not carbon steel pans.

    FWIW, I much prefer carbon steel pans to cast iron. I have a small collection of cast iron pans that I've inherited and used for years and years, really old stuff, and I hardly use them any more becasue I like the De Buyer carbon steel pans much much better. I find the carbon steel pans offers the same benefits off weight, heat retention, non-stick, etc. w/ better handles and shapes and overall better performance.

    Here's a great article on cookware. Cheers! mpp
    http://forums.egullet.org/index.php?...etop-cookware/
    Shibui - simplicity devoid of unnecessary elements

  9. #109
    Senior Member DwarvenChef's Avatar
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    Personally I think the dietary bits could use it's own post.

    I have only used flax seed oil in salads... have to give that a try in the skillet and see what changes Nice round griddle by the way, I have a 12" lodge griddle and have the same issues with it. Been working on a temp and time line up that may get things going for this pan but untill I get it worked out the griddle that straddles two burners gets the majority of use.

  10. #110
    Senior Member Shinob1's Avatar
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    I've read quite a bit about seasoning and it seems to be that there are those who season by using it and others who go through a lengthy process of seasoning with various oils. I tried both and I noticed for me personally, that my pan got better after cooking bacon in it several times and wiping it down with just a thin coat of oil after use.

    I have been using Canola oil to wipe it down and EVOO for cooking. I think when I get my new pan I'm going to fry up a pound of bacon and see how it goes.

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