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Thread: Cast Iron Cookware

  1. #191
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    Quote Originally Posted by EdipisReks View Post
    That looks pretty neat!

    Has anybody tried the Turk forged iron pans or Komin? carbon steel cookware has mostly replaced my cast iron fry pans in common usage, and I have a lot of cast iron fry pans, but I think both of these look neat, if for very different reasons. I really like the Turk handle look, and Turk makes lots of other nice looking stuff. The Turk carbon steel pans look similar to Matfer. I'm not sure how pronounced the criss-cross pattern is on these Turk iron pans.
    These Turk pans looks really good, I am going to get one of their pans to see how that works. Any idea what the the criss-cross pattern is for?
    As for the Komin pans, I am not sure how well really thin cast iron would work, but you you might want to also look at Ronneby Bruk's ultra light line
    I haven't used this specific line but I have several pans of their classic line and have been happy with it.

    @Justin0505:
    Quite curious about these Finex pan, if you get one, please let us know how it peforms

  2. #192
    Senior Member Sam Cro's Avatar
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    Here is the How To Do IT correctly ! and yes it works any New cast Iron I get (used or Brand New ) gets it done this way Vs how my grandmother showed me it is much easier and will provide many many many years of service .(if you take care of it ) Cast Iron is the Original Non stick cook ware .
    http://sherylcanter.com/wordpress/20...ing-cast-iron/

    Samuel

  3. #193
    Senior Member bkultra's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by EdipisReks View Post
    That looks pretty neat!

    Has anybody tried the Turk forged iron pans or Komin? carbon steel cookware has mostly replaced my cast iron fry pans in common usage, and I have a lot of cast iron fry pans, but I think both of these look neat, if for very different reasons. I really like the Turk handle look, and Turk makes lots of other nice looking stuff. The Turk carbon steel pans look similar to Matfer. I'm not sure how pronounced the criss-cross pattern is on these Turk iron pans.
    I have been waiting for these to come back in stock. The only US reseller (the one you linked) says it will be mid February before they get them back in stock. I am looking to buy the one piece hand forged ones (both 24cm & 28cm) but can not find any reseller willing to ship to the US. The cost is cheaper in Europe and should help offset the shipping if I do get lucky and find one.

  4. #194
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    That's a great link. Thanks Sam!

    I've been looking for the best fat/oil for the polymerisation process. Best I found so far has been a combination of coconut oil and ghee (which is of course a form of pure butter). Worked better than other oils I've tried but when I cook something acidic like tomatoes, it strips the coating very dramatically. I'll definitely try flaxseed oil now. Very reluctant to bring my pan surfaces back to iron though!

  5. #195
    Senior Member Sam Cro's Avatar
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    You will Not be disappointed with the results if you follow this set of directions I have a vast amount of cast iron and cook with it very often as in almost exclusively once it is Seasoned Correctly you will be utterly amazed at its ability to cook flawlessly.

    Sam

  6. #196
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    Being a furniture maker it is interesting to note that Flaxseed oil is just another name for Linseed oil. Linseed oil in a hardware/paint/woodworker's store is often mixed with chemical "dryers" which are poisonous and is also much cheaper than Flaxseed oil which you might find in your health food store. The two names help keep people from thinking they might be able to ingest Linseed oil as a dietary supplement and save some money - though it would be fine to finish a chair with Flaxseed oil - It would just cost more and dry a bit slower. Linseed oil is a tried and true finish. It adheres to itself (builds) and it "self"- polymerizes well (hardens) which, is the reason it works on cast iron too. Most oils don't really polymerize -or "harden"properly and produce a weak finish. I use flaxseed oil on all my cast iron and find that in many ways the process of seasoning a pan has much in common with finishing a piece of wood. Just sayin'.

  7. #197
    Senior Member EdipisReks's Avatar
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    I picked up a Komin pan at W-S, the other day. Yeah, that thing is pretty light and thin, not sure if it would be a performer. The design is really nice, though.

  8. #198
    Senior Member EdipisReks's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by kannamaster View Post
    Being a furniture maker it is interesting to note that Flaxseed oil is just another name for Linseed oil. Linseed oil in a hardware/paint/woodworker's store is often mixed with chemical "dryers" which are poisonous and is also much cheaper than Flaxseed oil which you might find in your health food store. The two names help keep people from thinking they might be able to ingest Linseed oil as a dietary supplement and save some money - though it would be fine to finish a chair with Flaxseed oil - It would just cost more and dry a bit slower. Linseed oil is a tried and true finish. It adheres to itself (builds) and it "self"- polymerizes well (hardens) which, is the reason it works on cast iron too. Most oils don't really polymerize -or "harden"properly and produce a weak finish. I use flaxseed oil on all my cast iron and find that in many ways the process of seasoning a pan has much in common with finishing a piece of wood. Just sayin'.
    I have a cast iron pan that was made during the Civil War. I guarantee that the only fats that were used on it, until I got it, were crisco and lard, and the seasoning (which was rancid, and had to come off before I could start using it) was hard and extremely durable. I've never used Flaxseed on carbon or cast iron, but I was impressed by the results of 150 years of use.

  9. #199
    Senior Member bkultra's Avatar
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    I was able to track down a 28cm Turk One-Piece Forged Iron Fry Pan for around $150 shipped to the US. I placed the order but it will be 2 weeks before it gets here. I will let you know my thoughts once I use it for awhile.

  10. #200
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    Quote Originally Posted by bkultra View Post
    I was able to track down a 28cm Turk One-Piece Forged Iron Fry Pan for around $150 shipped to the US. I placed the order but it will be 2 weeks before it gets here. I will let you know my thoughts once I use it for awhile.
    cool!!

    the skillets look awesome as well.

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