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Thread: Cast Iron Cookware

  1. #161
    Senior Member DwarvenChef's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by JanusInTheGarden View Post
    Seems to me the best way to tell then would be the thickness of the pan? Also where do I get professional quality cast/black iron pans? The ones we had at the restaurant held 3 rounded rivets (?) supporting a handle that was just a flat metal bar. They were much denser/heavier than the stainless and it wasn't by a little bit.
    DeBuyer is the name I just could not remember lol That would be the carbon steel pan, most carbon steel pans have riveted or tap welded handles. Cast iron pans will have a handle as part of the pan, they are a one piece casting nine times out of ten. A few cast iron pans have a bolted on handle. Also cast iron pans will be much heavier than a stainless or carbon pan.

  2. #162
    Senior Member JanusInTheGarden's Avatar
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    This potentially carbon steel pan was very thick and heavy though. Is that a characteristic of De Buyer?
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  3. #163
    Senior Member EdipisReks's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by JanusInTheGarden View Post
    This potentially carbon steel pan was very thick and heavy though. Is that a characteristic of De Buyer?
    some of the DeBuyer carbon pans are very substantial.

  4. #164
    Senior Member Shinob1's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by EdipisReks View Post
    some of the DeBuyer carbon pans are very substantial.
    Mine is for sure. About as heavy as my Lodge 10 skillet.

  5. #165

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    Quote Originally Posted by JanusInTheGarden View Post
    Ok so i'm sure this will prove my complete lack of knowledge on the subject but can someone help me determine the difference between black steel, carbon steel, and cast iron in saute pans? When I was working in my last restaurant we kept referring to our pans as either stainless or cast iron...only thing is I can't seem to find pans like these when I look for cast iron (just find mostly lodge pans which are waaaaay thicker/don't seem to be the same material) and I find tons of references to black steel instead. Is black steel a type of carbon steel and if so is this a frequent option that can be confused (to the undereducated) with cast iron?
    Cast iron is a radically different material than steel. If you are shopping and not sure of what you are holding in your hand you could try what we call in the foundry as the Ring Test. When struck, cast iron makes more of a clanging sound. Steel will ring more like a bell.

    By the way, cast iron for all intents and purposes is cast iron. The cast iron of today is virtually the same as the cast iron of 100 years ago and the same as the cast iron of 1000 years ago. If anything, today's cast iron is in general much more tightly controlled. It is an amazingly complicated material as opposed to steel which is mind numbingly simple.

    -AJ

  6. #166
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    AJ, I must disagree with your assertion based I believe on the otherwise excellent article by Dave Arnold that all cast iron is the same. While I agree that modern cast iron pans can be improved by sanding and even polishing (which I have done) it does not follow that all cast irons are the same either in terms of metallurgy or manufacture - both being quite important. Even Arnold notes in his section on sanding modern cast iron cookware that "Eventually, through years of seasoning, unpolished cast iron can become extremely smooth, but never as smooth as polished cast iron." Which clearly implies that he recognizes a fundamental difference, for if polishing where the only difference then they should both have the potential to season equally. I have lots of anecdotal experience with old vs. new pans and they do not behave like the same animal in terms of hardness, density, tone, heating or thermal loading, browning, speed of conductivity or ease and quality of seasoning. There is research in fact that suggest that some vintage cast cookware was closer to a form of cast steel. In this interesting PPT see slides 33-38- http://www.google.com/search?client=...UTF-8&oe=UTF-8

  7. #167
    Senior Member quantumcloud509's Avatar
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    wow you guys go way deeper that i ever thought possible with cast iron loving my Lodge combo cooker ($35 on amazon shipped) also love my old yard sale find le creuset frying pans and 9qt pot. Unfortunately I have been using the Lodge mainly for baking bread because it has been putting off a bit more iron flavor than I was used to with my older pans which I gifted to people. Whats up with that?
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  8. #168
    I have a very old square Griswold and its like an ice rink inside. Very smooth and shiny, nothing sticks to that thing. My 4 year old 12" lodge on the other hand is not as smooth no matter how seasoned it gets. I do an oven seasoning twice a year and cook with it all the time, never use soap and stuff still occasionally sticks to it.

    Does anyone have a cast iron grill pan? I'm still trying to get it seasoned properly because if its not oiled really good then everything sticks to it and I get a build up of oil between the ridges that my scraper can't quite get.

  9. #169
    I have a Lodge grill pan that I loved to use but was a pain to clean.

    What helps tremendously with getting that gunk out is a chainmail scrubber: http://www.amazon.com/Chain-Mail-Cas...nmail+scrubber

    It seems a little pricey until you actually use the thing. That's when you realize it's totally worth it.
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  10. #170
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    Quote Originally Posted by Erilyn75 View Post

    Does anyone have a cast iron grill pan? I'm still trying to get it seasoned properly because if its not oiled really good then everything sticks to it and I get a build up of oil between the ridges that my scraper can't quite get.

    I have a 16 year old CI grill pan [says Ronneby Bruk / Design Sigurd Persson / Sweden at the back]. It's a beaut of a grill pan but my fish still sticks. So I'd be interested to know how I can season it better.

    Erilyn, I use an old butter knife to scrape along the ridge valleys. It works but I'd like to know if there's anything I can do to make it better.

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