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Thread: Cast Iron Cookware

  1. #171
    Erilyn75's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by unkajonet View Post
    I have a Lodge grill pan that I loved to use but was a pain to clean.

    What helps tremendously with getting that gunk out is a chainmail scrubber: http://www.amazon.com/Chain-Mail-Cas...nmail+scrubber

    It seems a little pricey until you actually use the thing. That's when you realize it's totally worth it.
    I never would have thunk it! Thanks, I'm going to give this a try and hopefully it will make cleaning it less tedious. I'm about to put it away and get a cheap nonstick, that's how frustrated I am with this thing lol

  2. #172
    Erilyn75's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sambal View Post
    I have a 16 year old CI grill pan [says Ronneby Bruk / Design Sigurd Persson / Sweden at the back]. It's a beaut of a grill pan but my fish still sticks. So I'd be interested to know how I can season it better.

    Erilyn, I use an old butter knife to scrape along the ridge valleys. It works but I'd like to know if there's anything I can do to make it better.
    That's the million dollar question. I see people on tv cooking with these gorgeously seasoned grill pans and I'm just wondering what the heck they did because nothing ever sticks to them.

  3. #173
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    Another option is to just use a regular CI pan for fish. Fish cooks fine in a flat CI pan in my experience. My main point is that I don't think you want to use a non-stick pan for "grilling" which usually means high temps. There are lots of styles of pans but really only a few common materials and like knife steels there are pros and cons to each choice and no pan does it all. I own and use Mauviel (copper/stainless lined).All clad (aluminum/stainless), pre 1900's Cast iron (lots), plain Steel (paellas and a wok) and even a Brazilian soup stone pot. Pan designers take advantage of the physical properties of the materials to fine tune the pans to their potential. IMO the pros for cast iron are: 1.Generally less expensive than other high quality pans 2. Browns and sautes well. 3. Stove to oven to grill to fire cooking 4. Non stick for most foods 5. Can take high heat. 6. Great thermal loading which is why they are good at browning meat. 7. Easy to clean up when done right. Cons: 1. Relatively heavy. 2. Usually so so handles that also get hot 3. Non great for acidic foods. 4. Slow conductor so not so good for sauces or eggs - not that you can't cook eggs in CI but eggs and sauces are not a CI pans strongpoint compared to say copper or aluminum.5. Getting the good stuff requires some patience, study and looking on ebay or elsewhere 6. They need to be seasoned properly to work their best. Here are two good articles about when and when not to grab for the cast iron:http://www.cookingforengineers.com/a...ls-of-Cookware
    And a shorter primer: http://www.cookingforengineers.com/a...ls-of-Cookware

  4. #174
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    Quote Originally Posted by Erilyn75 View Post
    That's the million dollar question. I see people on tv cooking with these gorgeously seasoned grill pans and I'm just wondering what the heck they did because nothing ever sticks to them.
    stuff still sticks. you have to be patient, let it sear, crust..and then it releases. even fish. you set the food in, and it sticks immediately. dont touch it..let it crust.

  5. #175
    Senior Member quantumcloud509's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by boomchakabowwow View Post
    stuff still sticks. you have to be patient, let it sear, crust..and then it releases. even fish. you set the food in, and it sticks immediately. dont touch it..let it crust.
    Same goes for bbq.
    Amat Victoria Curam Fortune favors the prepared.
    "A human being is primarily a bag for putting food into." -George Orwell

  6. #176
    Erilyn75's Avatar
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    Another good budget line of enameled cast iron is the Martha Stewart brand at Macy's. I scored an 8qt a few months ago for $70, It cooks just as good as my LCs and saved me $300. I like it so much I just ordered the 8qt oval from their Black Friday special too.

  7. #177
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    Quote Originally Posted by kannamaster View Post
    3. Non great for acidic foods
    Still works decently enough for me. What to you use for acidic food, stainless steel?

  8. #178
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    A good trick is to get it full cranking hot and get canola spray. Spray it all over the surface. It will be a bit like a flame thrower but just control it and then get a damp teatowel and rub it well so the whole grill looks a bit shiny and well lubed and not dry at all. Then get a tray with oil in it and dip your fish skin into it and put it on the grill. Leave it until it had the right amount of color or seared marks and then take it off. Shouldent stick but it really comes down to fish quality and the way its been handled and portioned. If the skin has been left to dry out more it can help but it might not aswell depends on the fish .

  9. #179
    Senior Member NO ChoP!'s Avatar
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    I like to use course salt in a hot cast iron. It creates an infinitely small barrier between the protein and the pan, and also helps keep the moisture to a minimum, making for a faster sear. Just alter the seasoning of the protein itself to compensate. I'm not a fan of oils in cast iron. It will eventually turn to build up.
    The difference between try and triumph is a little "umph"! NO EXCUSES!!!!!!!
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  10. #180
    Senior Member Nmko's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by jai View Post
    A good trick is to get it full cranking hot and get canola spray. Spray it all over the surface. It will be a bit like a flame thrower but just control it and then get a damp teatowel and rub it well so the whole grill looks a bit shiny and well lubed and not dry at all. Then get a tray with oil in it and dip your fish skin into it and put it on the grill. Leave it until it had the right amount of color or seared marks and then take it off. Shouldent stick but it really comes down to fish quality and the way its been handled and portioned. If the skin has been left to dry out more it can help but it might not as well depends on the fish .
    I don't do that at all, i watch lots of chef's do it but i hate seeing little specks of black burnt oil and crap all over a nice filet/piece of meat.. What i do is wait until its adequately hot there's really no point to oiling a char (cooking oils burn at those temps) - If its a pan then oil it, Then Rub sea salt flakes into the skin and heavily coat it. ( salt breaks down oil but seals a surface when cooked on it. ) after the initial sealing of the salted skin, the filet won't stick and isn't excessively oily or covered in burnt oil specks or soggy... Its ALOT more gentle, and respectful to what you are cooking (in my opinion) - as opposed to lathering the product in oil and flaming it up on a char

    In turn the product is evenly cooked and no excess seasoning is required.

    With some species of fish i tend to make 2 small parallel slices through the skin so the filet doesn't curl at temperature.

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