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Thread: Something very special !

  1. #11
    Senior Member Seth's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Johnny.B.Good View Post
    That's the spirit!

    ...getting into now, thanks to you.
    Everywhere you go, there you are.

  2. #12
    You got one of each, Maksim??

    Then you told us they were more polished, yet cheaper Shigs??

    How does that compute!!?

  3. #13
    Always late to the party, I would have went for that usuba... Hopefully next go around I'll see the notice in time.

  4. #14
    Senior Member EdipisReks's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by BurkeCutlery View Post
    You got one of each, Maksim??

    Then you told us they were more polished, yet cheaper Shigs??

    How does that compute!!?
    no kidding!

  5. #15
    They are not Shigs. But made of same person that makes Shigs.
    I got what i can get. If there was more believe me i will be all over them

  6. #16
    Good to see non-domestic support of Tokifuza-san's youngest son, Maxim. Few take the time it takes to build a business contact with these great smiths and I'm not surprised to see they sold so fast, there are however a couple of points I would like to address which frankly doesn't make any sense. I do not mean to insult or give critique, rather that Shigefusa should be shown the respect they deserve. Reading this thread you make it sound like Tokifuza-san's sons have reached the same skill if not even greater just as they leave their apprentice role and start on their own path, this is not the case.

    Tokifuza-san has developed an extremely effective polishing method (as everyone should know of Shigefusa, so cheap for what you get) that is very similar to the traditional polish of Katana. He didn't just stumble on those techniques however as he has apprenticed both under a sword maker and a sword polisher, this along with very clever solutions to save time on the traditional polish is how Shigefusa came to be.

    This is why I have such a hard time imagining any blade in the world untouched by a sword polisher (not a cheap service) to be polished better than a Shigefusa, their standard is out of this world and you have to study a blade for a long time to even notice where the traditional and this swifter method differ.

    I hope you do not take offense to this post Maxim, but his sons have a lot of experience to acquire before they can be put in the leagues of their father. The knives may be stunning and a dedicated user might not notice the difference, but that difference will always be there if you understand what I'm aiming at. Especially considering their choice of steel and how sensitive it is when being laminated to iron.

    Perhaps you could use "shigefusa style polish" since they're so renowned for their finish?

    Regards
    Hal

  7. #17
    Quote Originally Posted by Halicon View Post
    This is why I have such a hard time imagining any blade in the world untouched by a sword polisher (not a cheap service) to be polished better than a Shigefusa, their standard is out of this world and you have to study a blade for a long time to even notice where the traditional and this swifter method differ.
    Are you referring specifically to the kitaeji Shigefusa knives? I only ask because when I received my kasumi Shigefusa gyuto, I couldn't quite understand what made the finish special. Perhaps it's a different sense of taste or (what some might call) a lack of knowledge, but it didn't seem very special to me in any particular way.

    For example, the finish on the Gesshin Hide special edition gyutos looks much more interesting/special than the finish on Shigefusa kasumi gyutos.

  8. #18
    Quote Originally Posted by Halicon View Post
    Good to see non-domestic support of Tokifuza-san's youngest son, Maxim. Few take the time it takes to build a business contact with these great smiths and I'm not surprised to see they sold so fast, there are however a couple of points I would like to address which frankly doesn't make any sense. I do not mean to insult or give critique, rather that Shigefusa should be shown the respect they deserve. Reading this thread you make it sound like Tokifuza-san's sons have reached the same skill if not even greater just as they leave their apprentice role and start on their own path, this is not the case.

    Tokifuza-san has developed an extremely effective polishing method (as everyone should know of Shigefusa, so cheap for what you get) that is very similar to the traditional polish of Katana. He didn't just stumble on those techniques however as he has apprenticed both under a sword maker and a sword polisher, this along with very clever solutions to save time on the traditional polish is how Shigefusa came to be.

    This is why I have such a hard time imagining any blade in the world untouched by a sword polisher (not a cheap service) to be polished better than a Shigefusa, their standard is out of this world and you have to study a blade for a long time to even notice where the traditional and this swifter method differ.

    I hope you do not take offense to this post Maxim, but his sons have a lot of experience to acquire before they can be put in the leagues of their father. The knives may be stunning and a dedicated user might not notice the difference, but that difference will always be there if you understand what I'm aiming at. Especially considering their choice of steel and how sensitive it is when being laminated to iron.

    Perhaps you could use "shigefusa style polish" since they're so renowned for their finish?

    Regards
    Hal

    If you are referring to me, I was using the word 'polished' as a metaphorical adjective. Like a 'polished singer' or a 'polished presentation'.

    I don't think anyone believes they are buying Tokifusa knife...but everyone wants to be ahead of the curve and buy a Murray Carter when they were $100, Bill Burke said he used to make hunters for $80, and Will Catcheside is giving his work away right now. The crazy demand is that everyone knows a deal when they see one! Tokifusa made, it isn't. But his son, who works in his shop, can't be too terrible!

  9. #19
    Senior Member Johnny.B.Good's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by heirkb View Post
    For example, the finish on the Gesshin Hide special edition gyutos looks much more interesting/special than the finish on Shigefusa kasumi gyutos.
    I have both a hon-kasumi Hide gyuto (the "misty" finish) and a kasumi Shigefusa. While I agree that the Hide is more interesting, the finish (and fit) of the Shigefusa that I received is flawless, and therefore special too. Just so smooth and uniform and nice. If Maxim says the finish on these is as good or better than that of Shigefusa, they must be pretty spectacular. I would certainly like to see one.

  10. #20
    Seriously!
    :

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