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Thread: Son's Old "Sabatier" WIP

  1. #41
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    Quote Originally Posted by Andrew H View Post
    Best choil shot. Ever.
    Haha. I was rather pleased with it, myself.

  2. #42
    Senior Member Benuser's Avatar
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    I have no experience with handles. Are there other options than replacement?

  3. #43
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    I could try to reshape the handle. The downside is I might end up with a big pile of wood dust and have to rehandle anyway. If I want to preserve something of the history of this knife, it will be the handle material. I've thinned the blade all the way up to the maker's mark so with a little more use, that will eventually have to go away, as well.

  4. #44
    Senior Member heirkb's Avatar
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    Depends if you're restoring it to use it or to preserve the history. That handle looks really tilted. I don't think I'd be crazy about using a handle like that.

  5. #45
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    Quote Originally Posted by Benuser View Post
    I have no experience with handles. Are there other options than replacement?
    well in this particular case the handle is only held on by a very small piece of metal. since it is a nogent style there is only a round rattail tang with the end pinged over. All you would have to do is grind off that little pinged end, which should take like 10 seconds and pull the handle off. I would then take the handle and use it as the sample to trace on a new piece of wood of your choice, cut it out, reshape it, drill it, shove it on and ping it over, give it a final shaping, put some oil on it and you are good to go. This method will allow you to save as much of the original handle as possible for posterity.
    I haven't lived the life I wanted, just the lives I needed too at the time.

  6. #46
    Senior Member Benuser's Avatar
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    Thanks for taking the time to explain, guys. Very appreciated.

  7. #47
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    Quote Originally Posted by sachem allison View Post
    well in this particular case the handle is only held on by a very small piece of metal. since it is a nogent style there is only a round rattail tang with the end pinged over. All you would have to do is grind off that little pinged end, which should take like 10 seconds and pull the handle off. I would then take the handle and use it as the sample to trace on a new piece of wood of your choice, cut it out, reshape it, drill it, shove it on and ping it over, give it a final shaping, put some oil on it and you are good to go. This method will allow you to save as much of the original handle as possible for posterity.
    Sounds pretty simple. What is the metal ferrule there for? This handle is solidly attached. You think it's just rust?

  8. #48
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    Quote Originally Posted by tk59 View Post
    Sounds pretty simple. What is the metal ferrule there for? This handle is solidly attached. You think it's just rust?
    I think rust is part of it, but those rat tailed tangs were put in red hot just like traditional wa handles and the back was hammered like a rivet holding the whole thing under compression that's why it is so solid. The head is like a nail head, wide at the top with the shaft going into the wood. If you look real closely at the heel of the handle about dead center you should see it, it's almost the same color as the wood by now and I'm sure when it was cooled it contracted and pulled itself in a little further countersinking itself and tightening the fit. Some of them even had a threaded tang and a little nut at the end that was threaded on and then pinged over. Those worked on the principle of post tensioning, the more you tightened the handle the stronger it got so long as you didn't over tighten and split the handle. That handle very definitely twisted that means there is nothing on the other end holding it in place, it is essentially rotating in a socket, got to a certain point were the width of the bolster end prevented it from twisting any more and got stuck, This is very common in old Nogent style Sabatiers.
    I haven't lived the life I wanted, just the lives I needed too at the time.

  9. #49
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    I see the little end of the tang that's been bent over. I'm just surprised that the handle somehow ended up twisted like this and then locked into place.

  10. #50
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    like pushing a fat girl through a window, You know she got in, you just can't figure out how come she can't get out. then you just run away before the cops come.
    I haven't lived the life I wanted, just the lives I needed too at the time.

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