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  1. #1
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    BBQ Frogs Legs BBQ Short ribs

    So I'm doing a bizarre meats bbq for about 16 people in a couple of weeks. I hit up the market just now and came back with a wide assortment of burgers and sausages (camel, emu, ostrich, bison, wild boar, I think there was a duck in there somewhere) that I'm pretty confident I know how to cook. I also came back with two things I need to research a little, I was hoping someone would have some tips. Those two things are frogs legs and buffalo short ribs. Also on order are some elk and ostrich steaks. I tried to get ostrich eggs for breakfast, but I gather the waiting list for ostrich eggs is a few months, who knew?

    The short ribs I expect to be fairly tough. I suspect they'll need an extended marinade and I'd probably be better off braising them then finishing them on the bbq than I would just bbqing them straight up.

    Frogs legs I gather I can treat just like chicken, so I might just give 'em the s+p and some bbq sauce on the grill. Maybe a simple dry rub or something?

    Anyone have any experience with this stuff? Recipes? Anything?

  2. #2
    Senior Member DeepCSweede's Avatar
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    Frog legs I have almost always had fried and served with garlic butter sauce. BBQ could be interesting but would probably mask the flavor profile.
    Key with Elk is to cook no more than MedRare
    No Clue on the Bison

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    That sounds AWESOME!

    Where did you find adventurous eaters?! I had to do the hard sell to get folks at my housewarming party to eat raw fish.

    The ostrich eggs I've had are really not very good at all---like eating a duck egg that don't stop.

    Bison is prone to getting tough, like you said, so don't let it dry out or it might burn. With ribs, I like mine on the dry side, as long as there is fat on them, but if your bison ribs look lean(hello, it's bison), I'd do the old pork rib 3-2-1 method, 3 hours in the smoke, 2 in foil, and 1 with the foil popped open, low and slow at like 225.

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    Quote Originally Posted by BurkeCutlery View Post
    That sounds AWESOME!

    Where did you find adventurous eaters?! I had to do the hard sell to get folks at my housewarming party to eat raw fish.

    The ostrich eggs I've had are really not very good at all---like eating a duck egg that don't stop.

    Bison is prone to getting tough, like you said, so don't let it dry out or it might burn. With ribs, I like mine on the dry side, as long as there is fat on them, but if your bison ribs look lean(hello, it's bison), I'd do the old pork rib 3-2-1 method, 3 hours in the smoke, 2 in foil, and 1 with the foil popped open, low and slow at like 225.
    We told them it was a pig roast, then when everyone committed to going we changed it up.

    It wasn't mischeivous, we just couldn't arrange a turning spit and I dontwant to crank it manually for 6-8 hours.

  5. #5

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    I would go farther and say that bison can taste half of the meat has been converted to rubber bands in the cooking process. LOL. I have only had frog legs fried and although I have had some that had a VERy slight "aquatic" taste to them, most of them tasted more like some kind of fowl and had a fine grained texture like quail. I have eaten both elk and nilgai and and cooked nilgai and they were safe to take to medium. IMO, they tend to be the most "beefy" tasting of the readily available wild game. Much more consistent and predictable than say whitetail.
    Quote Originally Posted by BurkeCutlery View Post
    That sounds AWESOME!

    Where did you find adventurous eaters?! I had to do the hard sell to get folks at my housewarming party to eat raw fish.

    The ostrich eggs I've had are really not very good at all---like eating a duck egg that don't stop.

    Bison is prone to getting tough, like you said, so don't let it dry out or it might burn. With ribs, I like mine on the dry side, as long as there is fat on them, but if your bison ribs look lean(hello, it's bison), I'd do the old pork rib 3-2-1 method, 3 hours in the smoke, 2 in foil, and 1 with the foil popped open, low and slow at like 225.

  6. #6
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    So here are the recipes I'm doing for this weekend:

    Bison Ribs:

    http://www.foodwoolf.com/2008/12/cof...s-low-fat.html

    I'm doing the ribs tonight (they're in the marinade now) then I'll reheat 'em on the weekend to save time.

    Ostrich Kebabs:

    http://www.foodiesite.com/recipes/2000-03:ostkeb

    Frogs Legs:

    - 6 tablespoons soy sauce
    - 6 tablespoons honey
    - 2 cloves garlic minced
    - 1 pinch ground ginger
    - 1 pound frog legs
    - Salt and pepper taste
    - 3 tablespoon thinly sliced green onions
    - Fresh sliced ginger root
    1. Mix all ingredients excluding frog legs in glass bowl. Reverse ¼ marinade to drizzle on frog legs after grilling.
    2. Combine marinade and frog legs in plastic bag. Marinade frog legs for at least 2 hours in refrigerator.
    3. Grill for 3 minutes a side over direct heat. TIP: Put aluminum foil on grill because legs are delicate and stick to grate.
    4. Remove legs from grill and drizzle reserve soy/ honey mixture over them.
    Elk & moose steaks are getting a dusting of onion, garlic, s, p and cinnamon.

    Burgers (elk, emu, camel, cangaroo and turducken) are just getting grilled. Should be a fun weekend.

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