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Thread: Sakai Yusuke 210 Wa-Gyuto Review

  1. #11
    Senior Member mpukas's Avatar
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    Thanks for sharing the thin knife. I've got 3 Yusuke's, and honestly they are so thin already I've wondered how much thinner could the thin versions be, and how useful could they be, since they might be too whippy? I've considered a 210 gyuto as a utility knife - I've got a 210 suji/petty and it's a very short height at the heel, too short for board work really. The 210 gyuto seems like it's not too tall to be used in hand. Gotta say again, love Yusuke!
    Shibui - simplicity devoid of unnecessary elements

  2. #12
    Senior Member Mucho Bocho's Avatar
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    Mpukas, Understood about the thin factor of knives. It so thin, almost as if it was disposable, if that makes sense. There is plenty of Knuckle clearance and I have huge hands inherited from my Portuguese grandfather. He never had a knife like this though

  3. #13
    Senior Member NO ChoP!'s Avatar
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    Recently got rid of my Yukes, and I must admit, out o the ten knives I've recently sold, the Yukes are the most missed. Doesn't help I sold them to a cook at my work, and I see them everyday.

    Couldn't agree more on the f&f....top notch!
    The difference between try and triumph is a little "umph"! NO EXCUSES!!!!!!!
    chefchristophermiller@yahoo.com

  4. #14
    Senior Member NO ChoP!'s Avatar
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    As far as the thinness, although the steel could hold a steeper angle, I think the super thinness almost forces you to stay at 15 degrees, so maybe super thin doesn't necessarily translate to super sharp...just my theory, though.
    The difference between try and triumph is a little "umph"! NO EXCUSES!!!!!!!
    chefchristophermiller@yahoo.com

  5. #15
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    Sharpness is relative. I think the thinness provides extra cutting performance so the perceived sharpness is greater. Yanagiba and other single bevel knives don't have all that steep of angles but the thinness at the edge makes it act sharper than the angle would suggest. You could also just sharpen it one sided being as thin as it is I doubt you'd even notice any potential steering.

  6. #16
    Senior Member labor of love's Avatar
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    The yusukes profile is flatter than konosuke? Interesting...Do you have any idea what steel they use for their stainless line?

  7. #17
    Senior Member stevenStefano's Avatar
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    I am glad you took the plunge and bought one. I have a Sakai Yusuke and a Konosuke and to be honest I think the Yusuke is a bit better . They are fairly different knives, but in terms of the grind and fit and finish my Yusuke is definitely superior, food release seems a lot better for example. The Sakai Yusukes are sort of an unheralded bargain

  8. #18
    Senior Member mpukas's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by labor of love View Post
    The yusukes profile is flatter than konosuke? Interesting...Do you have any idea what steel they use for their stainless line?
    Yusuke uses a couple of different steels, carbon and SS. Their carbon in white #2, hardened to 61-62. Edge gets wicked sharp, very easily, but edge retention is fair. My experience w/ their white #2 knives seems to be the same w/ other folks experiences w/ white #2. The SS they use is a Swedsh steel, I think, and hardened to 58-59. I think they may also use a cheaper, softer carbon steel for their less expensive knives.
    Shibui - simplicity devoid of unnecessary elements

  9. #19
    Senior Member labor of love's Avatar
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    Thanks. I'm curious which Swedish steel they use though.

  10. #20
    Senior Member NO ChoP!'s Avatar
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    I've read its AEB-L, or its equivalent, but not sure. I agree that Yukes f&f and grind beats Kono, but I like the Kono HD steel the best...maybe Yuke should do a semi-stainless...
    The difference between try and triumph is a little "umph"! NO EXCUSES!!!!!!!
    chefchristophermiller@yahoo.com

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