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Carbon Pan Seasoniong Question + Pictures
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  1. #1

    Carbon Pan Seasoniong Question + Pictures

    I just did my first seasoning/cookies and I have a few questiong

    First please check the picture


    Here are my questions:

    1. The stuff on the sides and left side, that feels to me kinda like oil and it flakes easily if I try to scrape it. Does it need to be there or does it need to do?
    2. The stuff the middle that seems to be like black, is that what looks like seasoning?

    How I seasoned: I first boiled potatoe shavings for 15 min, drained/washed. Then, pointed 1/2 inch oil and rubbed on sides and then brought it to temp for 10-15 min on low heat. Then drained most oil out and stuck it in oven at 350 for 90 min.

    When it came out, I wiped out all the oil. The pan looked like on the left side but a bit lighter. Tonight I fried some pork tenderloins in and then just washed with hot washed, soft sponge.

    Did I do anything wrong? If so, what should I do now?

    thanks as always

  2. #2
    The stuff on the sides of the pan are closer in colour to what I would expect from a single seasoning, but it should be thinner than that and not flake at all. I think you're leaving too much oil in the pan. You really only want a very thin layer of oil in the pan for this. When I do my (cast iron, but I doubt it's that different) pans, I put them in the oven upside down so all the excess oil drips out. I know other people who wipe their pans with towels to get most of the oil out. I also normally give it a few coats to get a good seasoning. The result should be even, smooth and hard. Not sticky, that's a surefire sign of too much oil.

    If I were handed a pan like that, I think I would scrub it shiny and start over.

  3. #3
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    mr drinky's Avatar
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    I was going to season my de buyer pan tomorrow or Friday. It'll be interesting to see what happens with mine. I just have the instructions that were with the pan. I think on Chowhound there are tons of posts on how to season pans. I might check them out too.

    k.
    "In Japan they don't call it Japanese food, they just call it food." -- Children's Hospital Quote

  4. #4
    Quote Originally Posted by Craig View Post
    The stuff on the sides of the pan are closer in colour to what I would expect from a single seasoning, but it should be thinner than that and not flake at all. I think you're leaving too much oil in the pan. You really only want a very thin layer of oil in the pan for this. When I do my (cast iron, but I doubt it's that different) pans, I put them in the oven upside down so all the excess oil drips out. I know other people who wipe their pans with towels to get most of the oil out. I also normally give it a few coats to get a good seasoning. The result should be even, smooth and hard. Not sticky, that's a surefire sign of too much oil.

    If I were handed a pan like that, I think I would scrub it shiny and start over.
    I assumed the same. I will start from beginning. I seen that shouls season it at 500f but my crappy oven can't handle it and likely get smoked up. Would few hours at 350 suffice or not hot enough?

    thanks

  5. #5
    Senior Member Shinob1's Avatar
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    Found this, hope it helps. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hQwCiYPW1Fg go about 1:30 into the video for the seasoning part.

  6. #6

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    What type of oil did you use? If it is flakey, or sticky at all its no good.

  7. #7
    Senior Member DwarvenChef's Avatar
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    I keep seeing these pans at the store and I always forget to grab one...

  8. #8
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    To avoid sticky oil film, it helps to heat the oil above its smoke point. I just heat the pan with a tablespoon, or more, of oil until it starts smoking. Then I use a wad of paper towels and tongs to wipe the oil around the inside of the pan. you'll start to see a nice black layer developing. here's a video from the wok shop http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hNPe5-swL-k she accomplishes the same effect but instead of a paper towel she stir fries chives. I've tried the chive method and it works quite well. if you cant find garlic chives, green onion works well too.

  9. #9
    Quote Originally Posted by ptolemy View Post
    I assumed the same. I will start from beginning. I seen that shouls season it at 500f but my crappy oven can't handle it and likely get smoked up. Would few hours at 350 suffice or not hot enough?

    thanks
    I think I've seasoned at 400 for an hour and had no problems. If it makes you feel better, this is exactly the problem I had the first time I seasoned a pan and I learned from a family that had been seasoning their pans for generations! They would just pour a couple of inches of olive oil in a pan and toss it in the oven for an hour or two. I think they had to do it like once a year, and their pans were the furthest thing from non-stick. What's the boiling potato skins about? I'm not familiar with that technique.

    Has anyone ever tried the wok-seasoning technique on a pan like this? I can't think of any reason why it wouldn't work, and it might be easier/better for people with weak ovens. I haven't done it or seen it done on anything other than a wok, so I can't advocate it.

    edit: I should have read obtuse's post. That's exactly what I was talking about.

  10. #10
    What is on the pan now might be machining oil applied to the pan in factory before shipment.

    What you have to do is spread little oil with paper, dont need much, over whole pan.

    Set it over medium-low flame and leave for around 15 minutes. Wipe dry with paper and repeat until paper after wiping is clean.

    Then you pan is seasoned.

    Worked with japanese omelett pan as well as with thai wok

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