Page 6 of 7 FirstFirst ... 4567 LastLast
Results 51 to 60 of 70

Thread: Carbon Pan Seasoniong Question + Pictures

  1. #51
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Posts
    444
    Quote Originally Posted by Shinob1 View Post
    Aside from the potato incident, how is the pan working out for you? I'm enjoying mine and the seasoning is coming along, but only one part of the pan has a darker black spot. The rest of the pan is taking on a brownish color, with some areas being darker then others.
    I really really like it. I still keep my cast iron for 2 things: sausages and tomato based sauces. Everything else, that's not starch based, is in this pan

  2. #52

    Join Date
    Apr 2011
    Location
    Oslo
    Posts
    1,424
    Quote Originally Posted by ptolemy View Post
    eggs don't stick
    Try frying tamagoyaki on wrongly seasoned/unseasoned pan

  3. #53
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2013
    Location
    bay area, california
    Posts
    1,033
    thread revival!!

    just about dipped my big toe into the pool of carbon steel. ordered my first DuBeyer. really agonized and decided to match the size of my current (brand new) restaurant supply store TEFLON pan..so i got a 10" pan. figured if this works, that is the pan i'll replace anyways. i think this will work because i go car camping all the time and i never feel brave enough to bring any teflon..only my vintage Griswold which is pretty silly on a backcountry trip. i'll be comfortable running the dubeyer in a campfire. and it wont kill me if it gets stolen.

    cant wait to overthink and agonize over the seasoning process..(like i did with the Griswolds and Wagners i have)

  4. #54

    Join Date
    Jan 2015
    Posts
    19
    Some time ago I purchased a bunch of carbon steel de Buyer pans for work. After much trial and error I found that the best method is using flax-seed oil.
    Heat up the clean pan, put literally a couple drops of the oil and distribute it evenly with a paper towel over the pan, so that you have a barely visible shine on the pan. Then you keep the pan on a medium heat till the oil starts to smoke.
    From there there is two options, either you take the pan off the heat, let it cool down and repeat the process several times, or - what I found works better - leave the pan on a medium heat, and once the pan stops smoking add another thin layer of oil and spread with the paper towel. Its important to use minimal amount of oil, and wait till the oil stops smoking between the applications. This ensures the layers of oil properly polymerize before you add another layer

  5. #55
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2013
    Location
    bay area, california
    Posts
    1,033
    Quote Originally Posted by cain47 View Post
    Some time ago I purchased a bunch of carbon steel de Buyer pans for work. After much trial and error I found that the best method is using flax-seed oil.
    Heat up the clean pan, put literally a couple drops of the oil and distribute it evenly with a paper towel over the pan, so that you have a barely visible shine on the pan. Then you keep the pan on a medium heat till the oil starts to smoke.
    From there there is two options, either you take the pan off the heat, let it cool down and repeat the process several times, or - what I found works better - leave the pan on a medium heat, and once the pan stops smoking add another thin layer of oil and spread with the paper towel. Its important to use minimal amount of oil, and wait till the oil stops smoking between the applications. This ensures the layers of oil properly polymerize before you add another layer
    thanks!!

    i also use flaxoil. i typically "bake" the thing in my weber gas grill. just did a very rusty dutch oven this way, and it came out looking black and beautiful. i'll abandon the dutch-O in my brother's camper for outdoor cooking. i dont need a CI dutch.

    i kinda want to use the same method for my carbon pan, but i see a silicon plug in the handle that would vaporize at my weber temps

  6. #56
    Senior Member DamageInc's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2015
    Location
    Paris
    Posts
    880
    I do what America's Test Kitchen does:



    It works.
    Don't drink out of ornamental ponds in Tiergarten. You will get sick.

  7. #57
    Senior Member Mucho Bocho's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Location
    Raleigh, NC
    Posts
    2,778
    Good to know Damage. I just added this piece. I haven't seen this shape before in MineralB.

    http://www.debuyer.com/en/products/m...iveted-handles
    One thing you can give and still keep...is your word.

  8. #58
    Senior Member DamageInc's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2015
    Location
    Paris
    Posts
    880
    Quote Originally Posted by Mucho Bocho View Post
    Good to know Damage. I just added this piece. I haven't seen this shape before in MineralB.

    http://www.debuyer.com/en/products/m...iveted-handles
    Me neither. I've never really had use for an oval frying pan though. I hope it serves you well.
    Don't drink out of ornamental ponds in Tiergarten. You will get sick.

  9. #59
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2014
    Posts
    159
    Quote Originally Posted by cain47 View Post
    Some time ago I purchased a bunch of carbon steel de Buyer pans for work. After much trial and error I found that the best method is using flax-seed oil.
    Heat up the clean pan, put literally a couple drops of the oil and distribute it evenly with a paper towel over the pan, so that you have a barely visible shine on the pan. Then you keep the pan on a medium heat till the oil starts to smoke.
    From there there is two options, either you take the pan off the heat, let it cool down and repeat the process several times, or - what I found works better - leave the pan on a medium heat, and once the pan stops smoking add another thin layer of oil and spread with the paper towel. Its important to use minimal amount of oil, and wait till the oil stops smoking between the applications. This ensures the layers of oil properly polymerize before you add another layer
    It would be really great if you could post a pic or two. Every picture I've seen, and every pan I've tried with flaxseed oil, ends up with a "mottled" appearance.

  10. #60
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2011
    Posts
    941
    I still don't know how you guys stand that hot linseed oil smell all over the house. Even if I didn't mind it, my wife was way annoyed with me. Back to several coats of peanut oil in the oven.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •