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Thread: patina development with various foods

  1. #1
    Senior Member Keith Neal's Avatar
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    Smile patina development with various foods

    It might be of interest to put together a list of foods that create patina more than others. If you will tell me what foods have what degree of reactivity in developing patina, I will compile a list and update it as data is provided.

    Perhaps a scale of zero (none) to five (most) would help express the degree to which various foods develop patina. For instance:

    FOOD DEGREE comments
    blood 5 blue patina
    mustard 4 brown patina
    citrus fruit 4 brown patina
    collard greens 0

    If there is interest in this, please provide your input.
    If you reach the age of 60 without becoming a curmudgeon, you haven't been paying attention.

  2. #2
    As a newbie was going to ask this same question Keith! I have a few nice new polished knifes and was wondering how I could develop a "nice" patina - not knowing how or what foods do what. Looks like I'll be eating and prepping more meat (normally eat mostly fish) as I like the knives I've seen with blue patina's thanks!

    I've used my knives (all high carbon steel/reactive) a little and was conscious not to leave them wet for any length of time not wanting rusting etc... but to force a patina what is the best approach say if cutting meat should they be left for a short while or is it enough to wash them fairly quickly allowing the patina to develop over time?

  3. #3
    Woulnt patina also depend on:
    Type of steel
    Time
    Temprature
    Air/huminity

    ?

  4. #4
    Senior Member Keith Neal's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by oivind_dahle View Post
    Woulnt patina also depend on:
    Type of steel
    Time
    Temprature
    Air/huminity

    ?
    Yes, the degree and maybe color of patina woulld vary with those factors, but I think the relative ranking of various foods would remain fairly constant.
    If you reach the age of 60 without becoming a curmudgeon, you haven't been paying attention.

  5. #5
    Senior Member Benuser's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by oivind_dahle View Post
    Woulnt patina also depend on:
    Type of steel
    Time
    Temprature
    Air/huminity

    ?
    Finish?

  6. #6
    As a newbie as well, it would be great to know. I have so many questions about this but will save for another time

  7. #7
    Senior Member stevenStefano's Avatar
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    Personally I feel that the affect of different foods on patina is highly exaggerated. I personally think it is more to do with the time you have used the knife rather than what foods you cut. I think after a while your knife will form pretty much the same patina no matter what you cut, the knife needs "broken in" so to speak where after a while the reactivity balances out and the patina forms very quickly no matter what you cut

  8. #8
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    The other day, I used a newly finished petty made from DT-carbon to core strawberries and take apart some chickens. The tip is gray/black from the strawberries. The rest of the knife is blue.

  9. #9
    Senior Member stevenStefano's Avatar
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    My knives go an electric blue colour after a while now when I cut lettuce. Could be that I cut so many different things that the patina changes a lot I guess

  10. #10
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    It seems that acidic items turn carbon knives shades of black and proteins turn them blue. What I'm wondering as far as proteins go, does fish have the same effect as beef and what effect does raw versus cooked make. Would you get the same colorization from cutting proteins that were hot from being cooked as you would from cutting proteins that were cooked, but had been thoroughly chilled to refrigeration temperature? Or does it have more to do with the fact that the knife has gotten warmed up from cutting hot proteins?

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