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Thread: Need Help with a family dinner - Pulled Pork

  1. #11
    Senior Member Shinob1's Avatar
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    Thanks for the advice so far. I think I'm 100 percent going to use the oven. My plan was to cook it for 10 to 12 hours. I thought about putting it in around Midnight the night before and taking it out around noon the next day. The sides I'd like to prepare ahead of time or while the meat is cooking that morning.

    I'm also going to do some coleslaw for sure, does anyone have a good recipe? Need specifics on the quantities of the ingredients.

    As for the green beans, I've never used fresh beans before, (I know shame shame!). What do I need to do in order to prepare them? Do I just give them a wash and put them in to a pot that had bacon cooking in it with some stock? How long do they need to cook for?

    Thanks again for all of the help!

  2. #12
    How to cook green beans depends on what kind of end result are you looking for. Are you looking to make stewed green beans that are very soft, or something where the green beans are tender, or still crisp.

    Personally, we cook green beans often and never stewed. We blanch them in salted boiling water until just cooked through, about 5 minutes, then shock them in iced water until cool. Then render lardons of bacon until crisp, take out the bacon, add aromatics like shallots until wilted, then add the blanched green beans until cooked through, salt and pepper, add a touch of stock if you'd like, then finish by adding the reserved bacon. You can add nuts - almonds, walnuts, for crunch - or use pancetta for a different flavor (and top with shaved parmesan).
    Michael
    "Don't you know who he is?"

  3. #13
    Das HandleMeister apicius9's Avatar
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    I like my green beans more like the Greek make them, sweat some shallot in olive oil, add the beans for a moment, add chunky tomato sauce/chopped peeled tomatoes, season and simmer until the beans are very soft.

    Stefan

  4. #14
    Senior Member BobCat's Avatar
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    on the smokey paprika. We like Pimenton de la Vera picante, a hot spanish paprika. Great flavor to pork.

    Green beans: meh
    “Lettuce is divine, although I’m not sure it’s really a food.” D. Vreeland

  5. #15
    Senior Member Shinob1's Avatar
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    I don't know if you all have been to City BBQ, but it's there green beans that I am trying to recreate. I'm 99 percent sure they are stewed.

    However if I were to abandon green beans in favor of baked beans, how would I go about it? Previously all I've done is open a can up and heat it.

  6. #16
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    For cole slaw I like to use napa cabbage. I mix some seasoned rice wine vinegar into some mayo for the dressing, and add some grated veggies that are handy. It always goes over well.
    Spike C
    "The Buddha resides as comfortably in the circuits of a digital computer or the gears of a cycle transmission as he does at the top of a mountain."
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  7. #17
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    I have a smokers so I am just thinking off the top of my head, but if you want a crust I have had good luck hitting the outside of beef roast with a blow torch before roasting at a low temp. Also I would make sure your roasting pan is deep so it can hold all the melting fat without overflowing.

  8. #18
    Senior Member Lucretia's Avatar
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    Shinob1, I'm starting to get a little nervous about this. One of the cardinal rules for a successful dinner party is don't cook anything new. Not that anything you're doing is that complicated, it's just that you won't be familiar with the quirks and timing. And the family WILL crowd into your kitchen and interrupt at crucial times to tell you that great-great uncle Henry's second cousin's dog has fleas, and oh, by the way, I can't find a bottle opener can I use your knife to open my beer...let me just grab it from you for a minute while you put out the fire on the stove. One thing you might want to do with the pork is go ahead and try it. If it doesn't get done on time, is dried out or nasty, you don't have a train wreck in front of family. If it turns out well, you can put the pulled pork in the freezer, and when it's time for the family meal put in in the crockpot with a little stock or bbq sauce to slowly warm up to make your sandwiches.

    Cole slaw is something you can experiment with in small batches. Starting with shredded cabbage & carrots, I like mine with mayo, sugar, lime juice, salt, pepper, and celery seed. Or mayo, soy sauce, sesame oil, chili oil, sugar, salt, pepper, ginger, mandarin oranges, scallions & sunflower seeds. It all boils down to what you like. Start with what looks like enough mayo to lightly coat your cabbage, start adding things a little at a time, and taste as you go along. Season the cole slaw sauce a little more strongly than you want the final result--the flavors will fade a bit as the cole slaw sits and chills.

    Doctoring a can of baked beans can give a pretty good result. Dump your beans in a casserole dish and add a couple good squirts of ketchup and plop of mustard. Add brown sugar to suit your taste & some onion powder for flavor. Stir and taste--adjust seasonings. Also good to put some bbq sauce in there. Put a couple of strips of raw bacon on top, and bake at 350-375 for 1/2-1 hour until bubbly. Beans are pretty forgiving, and will sit on the counter and wait for you.

    To prep green beans (aka "string beans")--holding the bean in one hand, grab the tip of the bean with the other and bend it until it snaps, then pull down the length of the bean to remove the "string". Repeat with the other end of the bean.

  9. #19
    Senior Member
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    Listen to the lady.
    Spike C
    "The Buddha resides as comfortably in the circuits of a digital computer or the gears of a cycle transmission as he does at the top of a mountain."
    Pirsig

  10. #20
    I think one of the keys to coleslaw is sweating the water out of the cabbage before dressing it. Slice the cabbage and toss it around in a colander with a few large pinches of salt. Let it stand in the sink for a while.....it will give off a lot of water and result in crispier, less watery coleslaw. I can come up with a more specific recipe if you like.

    For your green beans, I'm not familiar with the restaurant you are trying to emulate, but I love roasting them, and it's a forgiving, non time critical method. Just put the beans in a roasting pan with several peeled and halved shallots, a few glugs of olive oil and salt, and roast in the oven until tender. The shallots caramelize and sweeten the beans. This can be done the night before, or the morning of, and then needs just a quick reheat.

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