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Deba Do's and Dont's
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Thread: Deba Do's and Dont's

  1. #1

    HHH Knives's Avatar
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    Deba Do's and Dont's

    Quick question. Deba. What is it. and whats it mainly used for?

    What are the specs and grinds like, traditionally and or otherwise?

    I am going to try to make one in the near future. and have never had one in hand to use or examine. Maybe someone has one I could borrow for a week to use lightly, and examine the way its ground, and take some specks off..

    I think that will help make the test Deba closer to good. and not a total waste of time and steel. lol

    I appreciate any comments and guidance guy, and thank you in advance!

    I understand that there may be many opinions as to what good or sizes etc. Im not trying to start a debate, more so to gain knowledge from all your experiences and opinions.

    Randy

    Inspired by God, Forged by Fire, Tempered by Water, Grounded by Earth, Guided by the spirit.. Randy Haas

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    Senior Member Deckhand's Avatar
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    Surprised there aren't 20 responses already. That being said I have a Kanisaki deba you can borrow anytime. It has the opposite bevel for crab to crack the leg without hurting the meat. I think Debas in general are for fish. I love the weight and feel of mine, and plan on buying more Debas. I am sure there will be a long list of people willing to loan you one. Otherwise, I can just grab a cheap one from eBay $50-$70 and just send it to you. Let me know. I would be happy to help.

  3. #3
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    deba is for filleting fish, and I use mine very successfully for chicken too.\
    There is a traditional single bevel with convex back (just like yanagi, usuba) .
    There is also western style deba which is symmetric.
    Measurements very depending on size.

  4. #4

    HHH Knives's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Deckhand View Post
    Surprised there aren't 20 responses already. That being said I have a Kanisaki deba you can borrow anytime. It has the opposite bevel for crab to crack the leg without hurting the meat. I think Debas in general are for fish. I love the weight and feel of mine, and plan on buying more Debas. I am sure there will be a long list of people willing to loan you one. Otherwise, I can just grab a cheap one from eBay $50-$70 and just send it to you. Let me know. I would be happy to help.
    OK, I cant believe there are not more responses to this question myself. Maybe I put the question in the wrong place and it didnt get seen?


    How about this. Let me ask ,, Whats your Favorite Deba, and why?

    Maybe I can get enough info from that to do some Google searches and stuff and find the info im looking for. Like What are the traditional specs? heel height, blade thickness at the spine, blade length etc? Or is it to broad of a question?

    Thanks

    Inspired by God, Forged by Fire, Tempered by Water, Grounded by Earth, Guided by the spirit.. Randy Haas

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    JohnnyChance's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by HHH Knives View Post
    Maybe I can get enough info from that to do some Google searches and stuff and find the info im looking for. Like What are the traditional specs? heel height, blade thickness at the spine, blade length etc? Or is it to broad of a question?
    It is a pretty broad question. There are perhaps more varieties of debas than any other style of single bevel knife. They make thin-ish, thick and extra thick versions, in all sorts of lengths and heel heights, and in all sorts of shapes for different applications. Like deckhand's Kanisaki deba, which is used for crab. Gator's site lists some of the varieties of deba, all of which come in different sizes.

    I would concentrate on a basic/standard 180mm deba.
    "God sends meat and the devil sends cooks." - Thomas Deloney

  6. #6
    Senior Member Mucho Bocho's Avatar
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    This link could offer some useful information. Posted last week

    http://www.kitchenknifeforums.com/sh...s-the-question

    I chose a Sakai 195 in Hitachi Blue #2 finished Hon Kasumi with Saya. The seller is on ebay under BluewayJapan his name is Keiichi. I've purchased several knives from him. Last one was a Yusuke Sakai ultra-thin Wa-gyuto in White #1. Ordered it Thursday, was delivered to my house on Tuesday.

    http://yayasyumyums.blogspot.com/201...oto-osaka.html


    Hope that helps.

  7. #7

    echerub's Avatar
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    I tend to use one of my debas more than any of the others, which I honestly haven't put in enough time on yet to really compare and contrast. I know that I like using my deba(s) and I find fileting fish to be relaxing and enjoyable, but beyond that... I don't have much in the way of details that'll be helpful for ya, Randy.
    Len

  8. #8

    echerub's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by JohnnyChance View Post
    They make thin-ish, thick and extra thick versions, in all sorts of lengths and heel heights, and in all sorts of shapes for different applications.
    I would concentrate on a basic/standard 180mm deba.
    Ah, this I could say a smidge about. As a home user, 165mm and 180mm are great. The only times I use anything bigger are for some pretty nicely-sized salmon I pick up every once in a while. With something so soft like salmon, a thinner blade is really nice to use ... but I find that I still switch over to a regular-thickness hon-deba to go through the spine either at the beginning to take the head off or at the end to chunk up the "leftovers" (including the head) for broiling. If I didn't have the luxury of having multiple debas to use, I'd certainly go with just a regular deba. The thinner ones are, in my view, pure luxury because I *do* go through spinal columns and heads, not just filet off the meat.
    Len

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    HHH Knives's Avatar
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    Now I am getting it.. And yes, It was way to broad of a question. I didnt know there were that many variations of the deba. Thank you guys for the info and the links. Its starting to become clearer. and I will have to determine what thickness and size best suites my needs and or my customers needs.

    Lets say for example. You dont own a deba, and have used a few of the sizes and thicknesses, and even grinds.. And you hab too purchase just one. to use as a all around tool. And you could only have one in your bag.. what one would it be?

    Inspired by God, Forged by Fire, Tempered by Water, Grounded by Earth, Guided by the spirit.. Randy Haas

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  10. #10
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    I'd suggest to maybe make a thread asking for measurements of 165, 180, 210 mm debas traditional style and if someone can give you western deba measurments.
    This way you will have a starting point?

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