Page 2 of 3 FirstFirst 123 LastLast
Results 11 to 20 of 24

Thread: Deba Do's and Dont's

  1. #11
    Since I fish Offshore and am sometimes lucky enough to catch big tunas, Mahi, etc, I like a bigger one, 210mm or longer. For the inshore fish, I would want a 165, but a bit thinner for the smaller inshore fish like fluke, striped bass, cod, etc.

  2. #12
    Seems like part of the answer would be to decide which kinds of fish you will be using it on, the type of knife and technique would follow from there.

  3. #13
    Or just buy a few different ones! I have 2 so far... Big and carbon for big fish at the dock, long, thin and cheap stainless for on the boat, but its too long/unwieldy for the smaller fish.

  4. #14
    Don't take this the wrong way, but I think the reason more folks haven't responded is because it is massively unlikely for you to nail a Deba on the first try. Or even first of several tries.

    That's not to say I think you shouldn't do it. I certainly do think you should!


    Have you and Jr forged knives to shape much? Forgive me for not knowing, but I assumed it was mostly dammy billet-making followed by stock removal. If you are forging to shape, you should tell people more, lol.

    Though now that I think about it, the idea of a stock removal deba makes me chuckle. I'd love to see that, but it'd probably cost $500 in belts!

  5. #15
    Quote Originally Posted by BurkeCutlery View Post
    Don't take this the wrong way, but I think the reason more folks haven't responded is because it is massively unlikely for you to nail a Deba on the first try. Or even first of several tries.

    That's not to say I think you shouldn't do it. I certainly do think you should!


    Have you and Jr forged knives to shape much? Forgive me for not knowing, but I assumed it was mostly dammy billet-making followed by stock removal. If you are forging to shape, you should tell people more, lol.

    Though now that I think about it, the idea of a stock removal deba makes me chuckle. I'd love to see that, but it'd probably cost $500 in belts!
    I have a Yoshikane Deba, 180 mm, Tamamoku pattern, Takefu V2 cutting edge. I haven't used it or any deba much, and am a complete amateur. However, what I like about the deba is dealing with bones or fish heads. The deba is very heavy and has a spine about 3/8 of an inch thick. I don't think it's correct to use the weight of the deba to chop off a fish head, or to split it, by swinging it like a cleaver or hatchet. So, I place the edge where I want it, and push down on the spine with my left hand. The fat spine makes this very comfortable and safe. So, among the characteristics of a deba that others might tell you about here, my two cents is: fat spine.

    Also, the concave, ura side of the blade, I think, is set by the curve of the wheel that it is ground upon.

    Cheers,

    Jack

  6. #16
    The alleles created by mutation may be beneficial


    Join Date
    Apr 2011
    Location
    Hampton Roads, VA
    Posts
    1,864
    How are you going to form the ura? I'd love to see a WIP on this.

  7. #17
    I saw somewhere that people form the ura by making a curved platen in the radius of approximately a 48" wheel. IE take a piece of metal and grind/bend it until it is a nice, shallow radius and grind on that as a platen instead of using a wheel. Other people smaller cuts on a large wheel, then blend them together.

  8. #18
    Thanks Guys.. This has been very helpful!!

    Inspired by God, Forged by Fire, Tempered by Water, Grounded by Earth, Guided by the spirit.. Randy Haas

    Availible Knives

  9. #19
    much more awesomer
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Location
    YUL
    Posts
    692
    I keep seeing the word convex used when referring to the back side (urasuki, most commonly the left side) of Japanese single-bevel knives. I am confused. Aren't they concave-ground?
    Francesco
    Unskilled flunky

  10. #20
    Senior Member
    SpikeC's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Location
    PDX
    Posts
    3,731
    Yes, they are concave. I think that mixing the two up is fairly common.
    Spike C
    "The Buddha resides as comfortably in the circuits of a digital computer or the gears of a cycle transmission as he does at the top of a mountain."
    Pirsig

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •