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Please spare me your petty advise !
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Thread: Please spare me your petty advise !

  1. #1

    Please spare me your petty advise !

    Yes, really !

    I took the board's advise on getting a cheap petty/ paring knife and got a forschner. while its a great value, I just never have any fun with it. It just never quite get sharp enough and stay sharp long enough. So I usually end up deboning chickens with my gyuto and cutting/ peeling fruits.

    My question is which petty should I be aiming for? I would prefer stainless steel since I can usually taste carbon steel when I cut fruits.

    I am thinking 150mm Kono HD or Yoshikane SKD11 150mm .....

    Thanks for your help in advance.

  2. #2
    Senior Member shankster's Avatar
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    I picked up a Kono SS 150mm,and I gotta say it's a sexy little knife.I use it every chance I get at work(still haven't de-bone any birds with it yet).
    Great knife and it's cheaper than the HD..

    http://toshoknifearts.com/shop/knive...ewood-d-shaped

  3. #3
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    I have a Devin Thomas ITK 150mm petty in AEBL that is truly excellent. You can't always find one though.

  4. #4
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    If you want a nicer parer, i think Butch makes mean ones.

    And if the Konosuke is on your list, then probably Gesshin Ginga should be there too. Jon has at least done an awesome job tweaking the geometry of their 210 suji/petty!

  5. #5
    Senior Member labor of love's Avatar
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    I recently picked up a zakari blue #1 petty 150mm from Jon. I like it alot. It has a thinker spine than the lasers but it's still thin behind the edge. Oh, and it's great for chickens.

  6. #6
    Senior Member cwrightthruya's Avatar
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    I have the Yoshikane Black Damascus Petty found below and I love it. It is not stainless, but instead a semi-stainless and takes a bit of a patina after use. The most important thing is that it does not leave any odd tastes in my food.

    http://www.japanesenaturalstones.com...80mm-p/616.htm
    At Death's Door You Only Have 2 choices. Die Happy or Die Regretfully.
    Knowing this...........Choose 1 and Live!!!!!!!!!

  7. #7
    I have a Konosuke White #2 petty and it is essentially a scalpel, so very thin and incredibly sharp. I don't trust myself to debone a chicken with it due to my lack of experience so I would go with something a bit beefier such as the Zakuri mentioned above from Jon. However, if you are adept at breaking down chickens then the Konosuke or Geshin Ginga's would be a nice option. Go for the carbon though, they are so much more fun!
    Twitter: @PeterDaEater

  8. #8
    Go custom...check with del ealy...I like the looks of his

  9. #9
    Senior Member

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    I've used some super thin petties. The are great cutters but I have to say I prefer a little more meat on them. I tend to reach for my Masahiro MVH 150 from KnifeMerchant. My wife's favorite knife to use is a 150 Heiji semi-stainless petty. I like it quite a bit, as well and the edge it takes is probably my favorite among the stainless/semistainless available.

  10. #10
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    mr drinky's Avatar
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    If I were to get one at this point in time, I would probably go with a Rodrigue damasteel petty.

    k.
    "There's only one thing I hate more than lying…skim milk, which is water that's lying about being milk." -- Ron Swanson

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