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Thread: Fork and board question

  1. #1

    Fork and board question

    Now that I am getting into some nicer blades, I need some new accessories.

    First, I need a new, edge grain wooden board. Max size is around 22" long by 14 wide. Currently using a bamboo board (gasp, I know!) and I want to upgrade to help keep the edges. I am debating the juice channel feature. We cook whole chickens frequently, and the juices run all over the counter. Are most juice channels deep enough to contain a lot of juice or are they more cosmetic? I know I will lose some cutting space on the board. What are some thoughts on the channels??

    Next item I need is a strong fork. I have a couple flat tine forks, but they flex way too much when taking stuff out of the pans. When the tines bend, I tend to hit one of the bent tines once in a while. Any strong forks out there that don't bend like a wet noodle???

  2. #2
    Senior Member DeepCSweede's Avatar
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    Pierre had some cool forks he was upgrading a while ago, I would look into those.

    We have a two sided bamboo board that we picked up at costco that has channels on one side that is about that size. The only reason I bought it was for those channels. I like not running juices all over the place, however I have other boards that I use for cutting.

  3. #3
    Senior Member DarrenSwerid's Avatar
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  4. #4
    The blood grooves work, provided your counter isn't really un-level. I don't use them though, we just let the chicken rest a few minutes on a grate over the pan it was cooked in--lets the meat rest and finish cooking too. Then I just wipe up as I work, but I guess I'm just used to it from work.

    Why are you set on edge grain? End grain feels and sounds so nice!

    No recommendations on a fork, but I have one coming from Pierre and grew up with a sabatier, which never had the problem you are experiencing--it was very robust.

  5. #5
    Oops, should be end grain, not edge grain. I let the food sit, but they are still pretty juicy. I saw Pierre's forks and they look sweet, but I am looking for something in stainless.

  6. #6
    Senior Member Deckhand's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Taz575 View Post
    Oops, should be end grain, not edge grain. I let the food sit, but they are still pretty juicy. I saw Pierre's forks and they look sweet, but I am looking for something in stainless.
    Boardsmith Board and +1 on asking Pierre for a fork. If he is out William Catcheside is another good choice.

  7. #7
    much more awesomer
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    [deleted, wrong thread]
    Francesco
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  8. #8
    It's between a ProTeak End Grain board or a Boardsmith for the boards right now. Debating whether or not I want the juice groove. I have a very large plastic board that has juice grooves in it and they work, but there are a few grooves in the board. I wasn't sure if the one groove would work, but it looks like it should at least help out.

    Still researching various forks.

  9. #9
    Still Plays With Blocks
    The BoardSMITH's Avatar
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    No matter if you buy one of mine or not, keep in mind that Teak contains silica and can dull your edges much qucker than a maple end grain board. Also, Teak contains oils in the wood that can loosen a glued edge unless the glue joints have been washed with acetone or something else to wash the oils off. Normally the glues used are two part resorsinal (hope I spelled that correctly) glue which is terribly hard when cured.

    Perimeter grooves are nice but they take up a lot of working room, can be tough to clean and make it almost impossible to scrape food off the board.

  10. #10
    Senior Member
    99Limited's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by The BoardSMITH View Post
    ... and make it almost impossible to scrape food off the board.
    And this is the #1 reason to NOT have perimeter grooves. It's also annoying when you're just wiping the board down with a damp cloth. All the stuff you're trying to wipe up ends up in the groove.

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