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Thread: smoking wood

  1. #11
    I have used Pear on chicken, I found its a little stronger than you would think. But not as strong as plum.

  2. #12

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    The best ribs I have every cooked were with plum wood. These days, I generally cook most BBQ with a mixture of pecan and cherry. -Doug

  3. #13
    Senior Member wenus2's Avatar
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    Thanks Jim!

    I was able to salvage some branches from the burn pile. I will look forward to trying it. Would you use it on chicken again, or stick to pork/beef?

    thanks.

  4. #14
    I would use it again, yes.

  5. #15
    Just a thought. If you're concerned about how strong the flavor of your food will be using smoking woods, also take into consideration how large of a piece you are using and the location of where the wood is with respect to the fire. For stronger woods, I usually put small chunks (I rarely use logs), directly onto the fire right before loading the meat to get heavy smoke so as to get as deep as possible of a smoke ring as possible (there are several good explanations of the chemical process of creating a smoke ring on the web, that explain that the smoke ring is only created when initially smoking the meat when the meat is cold) and then putting small pieces throughout the charcoal to create a steady, but slow stream of smoke. For milder woods, I again start with a large piece to get heavy smoke, but use larger pieces spread throughout the charcoal to ensure a steady, greater stream of smoke.
    Michael
    "Don't you know who he is?"

  6. #16
    I think that what you said has a lot of merit. For real good BBQ I find that the quality of the smoke is super important. If the smoke is acrid or bitter your meat will be also. Really learning your particular cooker I think is the best way to do this. I always shoot for thin blue smoke. The worst is billowing white smoke.

  7. #17
    Quote Originally Posted by Jim View Post
    I think that what you said has a lot of merit. For real good BBQ I find that the quality of the smoke is super important. If the smoke is acrid or bitter your meat will be also. Really learning your particular cooker I think is the best way to do this. I always shoot for thin blue smoke. The worst is billowing white smoke.
    I agree. If the smoke is acrid, the meat will be acrid and bitter. I've noticed that pork is the most forgiving meat to oversmoke, then chicken, and last, beef. In my experience, you need to have a very light hand with smoke (or use mild, neutral woods) when it comes to beef.

    I also believe in removing bark from woods, if possible, because the rate it burns is different than the actual center of the wood. I also notice that the bark smells different than the center of the wood. (Yes, I smell the wood I use.)

    I also almost always leave the top vent of my cooker (actually, just a Weber 22.5 OG Performer) to let out the smoke to keep the smoke freely flowing. If the cooker is billowing white smoke, it's probably burning too much, too fast, and too hot. That's not barbecue.

    I agree with you Jim. Learning to use your cooker is extremely important.
    Michael
    "Don't you know who he is?"

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