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Thread: Your favorite cookbook?

  1. #41
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    Quote Originally Posted by rysara View Post
    Cookbooks aside, I still pick up Culinary Artistry. It's got a lot of information on technique and flavor profiles which can come in handy when preparing meals.
    I've gone through 3-4 copies of Culinary Artistry and now have the reference charts on my lap top and desktop at work. When being creative, 99.9% of the time it's the only book I reference.

    others I pick up most often

    Charcuterie: The Craft of Salting, Smoking, and Curing
    The Food Lover's Companion (fun for spontaneous food trivia)
    Culinaria Series (for learning foreign cuisine basics)

  2. #42
    Senior Member DwarvenChef's Avatar
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    More of an eye candy book series but I was hooked on them early in my discovery of real foods, The Beautiful Cookbook series. Huge coffee table style books that have fantastic pictures and good recipes, at least the ones I have tried. I have all but one of the books and I keep forgetting what one that is when I'm at used bookstores. While I'm trying to get them all in hardback I caved in when Borders offered reprints in paperback at around $8 each, I grabbed them all up figuring as I replaced them in hard back I could just leave out the paperbacks for anyone to mess with.

    http://www.amazon.com/s/ref=nb_sb_ss...the+beautiful+

  3. #43
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    A lot of good ones here, so I will just add a few that I like.

    * The Pasta Machine Cookbook by Donna German
    * The Perfect Scoop by David Lebovitz (for ice cream)
    * The 2002 Food & Wine compilation cookbook. I don't know why exactly -- a good year for my taste I guess.

    k.
    "There's only one thing I hate more than lying…skim milk, which is water that's lying about being milk." -- Ron Swanson

  4. #44
    Senior Member Johnny.B.Good's Avatar
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    Would one of the moderators please close this thread? The size of my Amazon wishlist just doubled! I have a few of those mentioned here, but not many. Perhaps Santa will bring me a few.

    As a quick aside, for those of you with more books than you know what to do with (like me), and who are slightly obsessive compulsive (also me), check out www.librarything.com. It's a site that lets you catalog all of your books online (by entering the ISBN). Once I found myself buying books I already owned on a semi-regular basis I decided something had to change.

    I guess my favorite cookbook at the moment would be The Flavor Bible. When I find myself with too much of a certain fresh ingredient (like basil for example), I look it up in the Bible and find ways to use it.

  5. #45
    Senior Member DwarvenChef's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Johnny.B.Good View Post
    Would one of the moderators please close this thread? The size of my Amazon wishlist just doubled! I have a few of those mentioned here, but not many. Perhaps Santa will bring me a few.

    As a quick aside, for those of you with more books than you know what to do with (like me), and who are slightly obsessive compulsive (also me), check out www.librarything.com. It's a site that lets you catalog all of your books online (by entering the ISBN). Once I found myself buying books I already owned on a semi-regular basis I decided something had to change.

    I guess my favorite cookbook at the moment would be The Flavor Bible. When I find myself with too much of a certain fresh ingredient (like basil for example), I look it up in the Bible and find ways to use it.
    Ack it would take so long to get the numbers in there...

  6. #46
    Senior Member Johnny.B.Good's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by DwarvenChef View Post
    Ack it would take so long to get the numbers in there...
    It was definitely time consuming, but sort of fun to "take inventory" for the first time. I just got tired of not knowing exactly what I had, what I've read, what I haven't, etc. This lets you keep track of it all. I entered the codes manually (I am a pretty fast typist), but they make a little bar code scanning gun that is pretty inexpensive and would speed things up considerably. Next time you are standing in a used bookstore and grab a familiar looking title off the shelf, you can jump online and know whether you have it hidden away somewhere at home or not!

  7. #47
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    Well, I don't know about ALL of one's books, but I have always wanted to do eatyourbooks.com. You enter your cookbooks in, and then you have a personal searchengine for your own cookbooks. I've heard good reviews about the site, but I have never taken the time.

    k.

    edit: they also index popular food blogs, which is kind of nice.
    "There's only one thing I hate more than lying…skim milk, which is water that's lying about being milk." -- Ron Swanson

  8. #48
    Senior Member DwarvenChef's Avatar
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    I ended up with 2 copies of Bruice Aidell's Complete book of Pork... oops

  9. #49
    Senior Member DwarvenChef's Avatar
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    Next book I'm getting is Stone Brewery's Cookbook, just haven't found a copy yet.

  10. #50
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    Well, it's definitely not my favorite cookbook, but Stefan mentioned books that opened doors. For me that was Momofuku. I got started cooking WAY late and had only just achieved some semblance of competency when I picked this up. This book was just different than other books I'd read. The approach to food and cooking was just different. I read the recipes and stories and the theme of the book didn't seem to be the usual "Follow these recipes exactly and your precision will achieve excellence" but rather, "Here's what we're trying to do. Here's how we think we did it. Take what we did, mess with it all you want, but whatever you do, make it bangin'." It was a completely different mind set. I haven't opened that book in over two years, but as far as impact, for me this may have been the biggest one to date.

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