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  1. #11
    Senior Member EdipisReks's Avatar
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    i'm a big fan of Local Breads. a great book if you have some sourdough experience behind your belt.

  2. #12

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    As much as I love The French Laundry, Daniel,and Alinea I find that I actually do more cooking out of any of the books written by Jeffrey Alford and Naomi Duguid Hot Sour Salty Sweet on Southeast Asia is probably their best,even though Beyond the Great Wall is pretty good. Their books tell about the people as well as the food

  3. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by jonnachang View Post
    As much as I love The French Laundry, Daniel,and Alinea I find that I actually do more cooking out of any of the books written by Jeffrey Alford and Naomi Duguid Hot Sour Salty Sweet on Southeast Asia is probably their best,even though Beyond the Great Wall is pretty good. Their books tell about the people as well as the food
    Their cookbooks are spectacular, very anthropological. They live here in Toronto, not too far away from us actually!

  4. #14
    GoogleFu San steeley's Avatar
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    WOW nice picks everyone !
    it is hard to pin down one or two books but Ma cuisine is one .
    Alford and Duguid are a favorite I think they have a cooking school in thailand .

  5. #15
    Senior Member Citizen Snips's Avatar
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    ad hoc at home easily

    i love the french laundry cookbook, bouchon, the flavor bible, momofuku, au pied de couchon, the fat duck, morimoto, and dessert forplay. a great drinking book is what to drink with what you eat. all those are great books but i find that the ad hoc is most used and home friendly

  6. #16
    Senior Member FryBoy's Avatar
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    I'm a cookbook collector, with well over 1000 titles covering all manner of cuisine (see HERE), so there are literally too many favorites to list. I guess my favorite "go to" book remains The Joy of Cooking, particularly the older editions. But I also like anything by Julia Child or James Beard. For Italian, I look at Marcella Hazan's books first. For Indian, those by Madhur Jaffrey. French, I look to Anthony Bourdain and a few others. Mexican means Barbara Hansen, although the Sunset books are actually quite good. Southern means Edna Lewis, but I also have the complete Southern Living series, also excellent. As for "American," I have the complete Farm Journal series, the complete Time Life series, and literally hundreds of other cookbooks filled with great recipes and interesting information, including several Amish and Mennonite cookbooks. For pressure cooking, Lorna Sass is queen. Chinese, I go to a little volume called The Good Food of Szechwan or those by Fuschia Dunlop. Baking -- I've got so many I can't pick (although my mom's recipes are great). I don't like The French Laundry Cookbook -- it's for show, not for cooking, a coffee table book.

    But my most treasured cookbook is one I'll bet few here have ever heard of, The Epicurean by Charles Ranhoffer, the chef of Delmonico's in NYC, published in 1894, nine years before Escoffier's tome. I'm privileged to own a genuine first edition of the book in nearly pristine condition, as well as a copy of the 1921 edition and a much more recent edition that is not too valuable to read. I've never made a thing from it, but it's still my favorite cookbook -- as a collector and would-be food historian. Here's more on the book: http://digital.lib.msu.edu/projects/...ks/book_47.cfm

    Doug Collins
    Hermosa Beach, California

  7. #17
    Senior Member EdipisReks's Avatar
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    as a fan of Caleb Carr's Laszlo Kreizler books, i'd love to make some Delonico's meals!

  8. #18

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    Cookbooks aside, I still pick up Culinary Artistry. It's got a lot of information on technique and flavor profiles which can come in handy when preparing meals.

  9. #19
    GoogleFu San steeley's Avatar
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    Thanks for link FryBoy nice book by the way I like the history of cuisine and chefs . nothing like cooking over coal stove .

  10. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by Citizen Snips View Post
    ad hoc at home easily

    i love the french laundry cookbook, bouchon, the flavor bible, momofuku, au pied de couchon, the fat duck, morimoto, and dessert forplay. a great drinking book is what to drink with what you eat. all those are great books but i find that the ad hoc is most used and home friendly
    Dang, I forgot about Au Pied de Cochon and I've eaten there! My favorite thing about that cookbook, apart from the mouthwatering food, is the hilarious illustrations. I can't remember the artist's name, but his twisted work totally reminds me of Ralph Steadman.

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