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  1. #1

    gyuto or suji?

    On another thread Johndoughy (hope I spelled that right) suggested that a long gyuto would be something to consider when looking at a slicer. I'm not opposed to having too many knives, but the idea intrigues me because I know my wife would use a gyuto more than a suji. Those of you who do a lot of slicing, what do you think? My main purpose in going with a Japanese knife is to get a blade that will allow me to slice, not saw the brisket, and to minimize cell damage. The slices are usually 10" or shorter.

    Maybe my problem is that I'm limiting myself to one knife this pay period.

  2. #2
    Senior Member

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    I'm just a home cook, not a pro or a competition guy, but I think that a gyuto would do for slicing, as long as you didn't have to turn the knife while making the cut. If you did, then the taller profile of the gyuto would work against you.

    That said, I'll suggest that you take a look at a Pierre Rodrigue sujihiki up for sale at KF. It's 30cm, and the price is right:

    http://www.knifeforums.com/forums/sh...hp?tid/897977/

    It doesn't hurt any that it's a good looking knife:


  3. #3
    Senior Member mattrud's Avatar
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    I want both! Well obviously. You can easily get away with using a gyuto. I have a 300mm hiromoto hc I bring around to friends houses when i am cooking with them and we are roasting some larger items what need slicing, But i also have a bunch of sujihikis I use. You honestly could go either way.

  4. #4
    Senior Member Cadillac J's Avatar
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    When I first started out buying j-knives, I didn't think I needed a sujihiki, so I purchased a 300 Hiromoto AS wa-gyuto thinking that it would work double duty...which it did for most things. However, after deciding to purchase an inexpensive suji in the 270 Fujiwara FKM to try out, I quickly fell in love with the narrow height and profile, and decided to upgrade to a better one just a short period later.

    Since then, a suji has been my main knife for everything during the past year, to the point where I only grab a gyuto once in a while. Granted, this is personal preference based on my own experience and not everyone would agree, so maybe start out on the cheaper end of things just to see what works best for you with your style...or go all out and get high-end versions of both (as you probably will down the road anyway)

    For home cooks, there really isn't a need for more than one or two knives...it is all about wants and having fun with it.

  5. #5
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    I bought a Ashi 270mm suji a month ago and love it. You could use it as your main knife, mine has enough blade height to give me ample knuckle clearance. Last night I used it to portion a whole beef tenderloin. It was sooo nice how the blade just glided through the meat. I can't wait for Costco to start carrying whole prime rib eyes again. I love cutting up meat.

  6. #6
    Senior Member Cadillac J's Avatar
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    Can someone tell the price of the custom Pierre that Pensacola Tiger showed above? I can't get on KF at work.

  7. #7
    Asking $425

  8. #8
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    WildBoar's Avatar
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    IMO, that Pierre suji is a steal. Mine is very similar, and is an absolute joy to use. It is basically a full custom at a semi-custom price point. And Pierre really nailed the suji geometry right out of the gate.
    __________
    David (WildBoar's Kitchen)

  9. #9
    My first J-blade was a suji my old boss picked up in Seki. I had no problems with it's design, but it was damaged to the point of needing a belt sander, so I got my own, and got a gyuto.

    To me, the only thing a gyuto has going for it that a suji doesn't is belly at the tip. If you have one of those super flat profile gyutos, why do you need the big slab of metal? It's not really supporting the edge enough to make a difference. Put some belly on a suji, and you get a wierd trailing-point...hence the gyuto design. If I were getting several knives, I could easily see why to get a suji, a nakiri, and a deba. If you want the center of those things(without doing any of those things as well), get a gyuto.

    Brisket is big, so I suggested a big one. The belly at the tip will help if you need the extra length to cut through something unexpected. The tip is nimble enough, while still being sturdy(sujis tend to chip IME). The key is not to over buff the blade, and it'll do a phenomenal job at brisket. But that's another topic, I suppose.

  10. #10
    Senior Member Aphex's Avatar
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    You could go with a gyuto/suji type hybrid like the Masamoto KS. The KS gyuto's run a bit shorter than normal chef's knives and make great allrounders

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