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Thread: Modernist Cuisine on TED

  1. #11
    Senior Member Crothcipt's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by The Edge View Post
    I can't wait to add this to my collection. As far as the recipes go, I usually don't buy a book because of them. Instead, I'm more interested in the techniques, flavor combinations, and history introduced. The main reason for getting any new cookbook for me, is to open my eyes to information I hadn't known, or didn't quite fully understand beforehand.
    I would love to get this book(s). Since I saw this last year I have been wanting it. When I first went looking it was sold out. It has been sold out a few times since then too. I also think the price has dropped 100$.

  2. #12
    Quote Originally Posted by BurkeCutlery View Post
    I would love to have that book. It looks full of wonderful information, and I loved cutaways as a kid!

    But regarding the recipes failing, his book fails to adjust to a simple fact: Recipes don't work. As in they don't produce food if you do exactly what they say. Maybe sometimes--maybe someone's lucky and it's most of the time. But Recipes are, as Alton Brown put it, in on Food and Cooking, like getting directions to a place. So long as you are always starting at the same place, going to the same places, and all conditions are conducive, you will get there. If you are anywhere else, want to go anywhere else, or something is different, you will have no skills, information, or recourse to get to where you want to go.

    As Herbert Simon showed: The human being striving for rationality and restricted within the limits of his knowledge has developed some working procedures that partially overcome these difficulties. These procedures consist in assuming that he can isolate from the rest of the world a closed system containing a limited number of variables and a limited range of consequences.

    Well the food just isn't so rational. It's great information to have for someone who is ready to cook and is ingredient minded, and has a healthy relationship with their food. But doing the 30 hour hamburger not only is not a guarantee to get a better hamburger(IMO it doesn't even sound tasty), but it's not even a guarantee to get that hamburger.
    Guess the chef of one and two stars experience didnt had the in-depth training to get the job done

  3. #13
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    sounds like it!
    Spike C
    "The Buddha resides as comfortably in the circuits of a digital computer or the gears of a cycle transmission as he does at the top of a mountain."
    Pirsig

  4. #14
    Quote Originally Posted by bieniek View Post
    Guess the chef of one and two stars experience didnt had the in-depth training to get the job done
    Can't tell if you are being sarcastic...but apparently he didn't. To extend the previous metaphor, I don't think if I gave a local UPS guy overcomplex directions to my house that he'd have any excuse for never finding it. He could see through the directions, and has an understanding of the entire territory. He drives it every day.

  5. #15
    Nathan is a gift to the world of food

  6. #16
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    I'm more curious about this than anything else. It is certainly on my wish list. As a textbook, it sounds fascinating. As a cookbook, it sounds ridiculous. I'm more into making awesome in 10 min.

  7. #17
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    Yeah, I just want to read through it. I have some of Heston's books, and whilst they were great to read I doubt I'll ever follow a recipe to the letter. Flavour combinations, cooking techniques, the science behind cooking are all transferable though. I love understanding how and why things work, regardless of whether I can reproduce them.

  8. #18
    Senior Member brainsausage's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by TB_London View Post
    Yeah, I just want to read through it. I have some of Heston's books, and whilst they were great to read I doubt I'll ever follow a recipe to the letter. Flavour combinations, cooking techniques, the science behind cooking are all transferable though. I love understanding how and why things work, regardless of whether I can reproduce them.
    I fully agree. Which is why these books are so much fun.

  9. #19
    Senior Member brainsausage's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by tk59 View Post
    I'm more curious about this than anything else. It is certainly on my wish list. As a textbook, it sounds fascinating. As a cookbook, it sounds ridiculous. I'm more into making awesome in 10 min.
    There's degrees of awesome, and some take longer than others...

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