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Thread: Best way to clean this up?

  1. #1
    Senior Member Lucretia's Avatar
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    Best way to clean this up?

    OK, it's not exactly a kitchen knife. But it might get used there occasionally. This was my dad's knife, my first experience with a custom. He had it made when I was in high school (and managed to sit around sharpening it menacingly whenever any of us had dates come pick us up.) He died about 10 years ago, and it's probably been sitting in its sheath ever since. I finally managed to get my hands on it, and it needs some cleaning up. I'm thinking a good wash with dish soap and water to get off some of the funk (drying it immediatedly of course!) then a round of Barkeeper's Friend. Saddlesoap for the sheath. It's stainless (no, I don't know which stainless) with micarta & nickel silver (I think the spacers are leather.) Sound like a reasonable approach, or is there a better way?

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  2. #2
    Certainly can't hurt to clean it.

  3. #3
    Cool story.

    STOP !

    Randall's are great collector knives and this one surely has some sentimental value.

    The green is verdigris- a reaction with the brass in the guard.
    Knife was stored in the sheath? A no no.

    The handle looks like micarta with an inlay and aluminum pommel.
    The blade steel appears to be their ss not the carbon.

    I'd just take a soft cloth with some mineral oil on it and gently rub the the whole knife down.

    The saddle soap will soften the leather sheath; not what you want.
    Perhaps a soft clean toothbrush only at this point.

    Randall folks can probably date this for you based on the sheath and handle combo alone spacer (material/inlay/etc).
    Bernard Levine, a Randall collector site, or wait for someone knowledgable to chime in here for more info on care and the knife...

    Maybe get a nice shadow box to put in in for display?

  4. #4

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    Sounds like a good plan of approach. Good luck.

  5. #5
    Lucretia, perhaps post it here:
    http://www.knifetalkforums.com/

    Not sure if you have to register or not.

    However, those guys are the Randall knife gurus and should be very helpful on any clean up, model, history, etc. advice.

    Last I heard, there was a 4-5 year wait after you submitted your order to get a Randall from the shop...

  6. #6
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    Lucretia , how sure are you that it's stainless? If I'm not mistaken, the stainless knives are marked with an "S", while the tool steel knives have no marks other than the maker's mark, like yours.

    Rick

  7. #7
    I would NOT use bkf on it.Try some flitz with a soft cotton cloth.

  8. #8
    Senior Member Lucretia's Avatar
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    The knife is roughly 35-40 years old. It was made back when Bo Randall was still alive. My dad spent many evenings with graph paper scaling down the profile he liked to get the length he wanted and maintain the proportions. That was probably before calculators were common household items--he did the math by hand. Mr. Randall was a little resistant to making the knife because he was afraid the balance would be off, but my dad persisted. It's not carbon steel--my dad's one complaint about the knife was that he should have gotten carbon because he felt it would have taken a better edge. It is micarta, and the the pommel, guard, and inlay are nickel silver. Dad wasn't very demostrative, but he would get practically giddy when describing the knife while he was waiting for it to be made--we heard about it often enough that it stuck in my head. I'm kind of surprised about the wear on it, considering he was not a very good hunter. Maybe he loaned it to his buddies at the hunting camp so he could actually see it used on a deer.

  9. #9
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    Well, stainless or not, it is a wonderful example of a Randall. I am envious.

    Perhaps 35 years from now one of my heirs will feel the same way.

    Rick

  10. #10
    Don't do anything to it at the moment. If you decide for yourself that cleaning it is what you want to do, and it is strictly a sentimental item, that is one thing. If you deem it a collectors piece, then do nothing to it until you consult someone with much more knowledge than I could hope to fake about any cleaning or restoration. That act alone could devalue such a piece greatly! In the end the final decision is yours to make, but it would be wise to gather all the info you can before committing one way or another. After all, it sat for years, whats a little more time in the interest of gathering information?


    Feel free to visit my website, http://www.rodrigueknives.com
    Email pierre@rodrigueknives.com

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